Scientific Program

Day 1

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • Controlling obesity-derived hepatic lipidosis and carcinogenesis through dietary broccoli

    University of Illinois
    USA
    Biography

    Elizabeth Jeffery joined the University of Illinois in 1983 and has joint appointments in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Pharmacology (College of Medicine) and the Interdisciplinary Division of Nutritional Sciences. Dr. Jeffery performs research in the area of diet, bioavailability and disease prevention, with a focus on cancer prevention using whole foods, including broccoli. She has served as program director for a multi-State research program on bioactive food components, on committees for the National Academy of Science focused on safety and efficacy of dietary supplements. Dr. Jeffery has a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of London, England.

    Abstract

    Diets rich in fat and sugar, often termed ‘Western’ diets, have become popular worldwide. Unfortunately, such diets result in an increase in body fat accumulation and development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), with the potential to lead to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a cancer with very poor outcome. Brassica vegetable consumption, particularly broccoli consumption, has grown significantly in popularity within the United States and many other parts of the world. Studies report protection against many different cancers by dietary broccoli. However, liver cancer – and even liver health in obesity – has not been evaluated before our present study. We hypothesized that broccoli slows or prevents both NAFLD and HCC, in a model of mice fed a Western diet and treated with the hepatic carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Male B6C3F1 mice received a powdered, control diet or a diet containing 19% lard and 31% sucrose, +/- 10% freeze-dried broccoli, wt:wt, with weekly DEN, 45mg/kg i.p. for 6 weeks. Mice were terminated 6 months later, at 9 months of age. Broccoli-fed mice had lower hepatic triglycerides (P < 0.001) and NAFLD scores (P < 0.0001), associated with changes in several biomarkers supporting a correction in handling hepatic lipid metabolism. Hepatic neoplastic initiation and progression were both slowed. These findings suggest the need for a clinical study to evaluate the impact of broccoli and/or other brassica vegetables on liver health in general and hepatic handling of lipids in particular.

  • Suppression of intestinally mediated diseases by consumption of polyphenol-­?Rich Sorghum Brans

    Texas A&M University
    USA
    Biography

    Dr. Nancy D. Turner is a Research Professor in the Department of Nutrition & Food Science at Texas A&M University. Her research program is focused on characterizing the mechanisms whereby dietary chemoprotective compounds found in fiber-containing foods mitigate colon carcinogenesis and inflammatory bowel disease. The Turner lab is particularly interested in understanding how these bioactive compounds influence the intestinal environment, with special attention given to the interaction between colon microbiota and the colonocytes. In addition, her work attempts to define the responses of the colon environment to radiation exposures and weightlessness, such as is experienced by astronauts on long-duration missions. Her research has led to the publication of 70 peer-reviewed papers, 6 book chapters, and she was one of the editors of a book entitled “Potential Health Benefits of Citrus”. Her research program has been supported by grants from NASA, the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, USDA/ARS, USDA/IFAFS, NIH, the United Sorghum Checkoff Program, and the California Dried Plum Board. She currently serves on the editorial boards of Advances in Nutrition, Journal of Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis, and Experimental Biology and Medicine. Dr. Turner has been a member of USDA/NRI review panels and an ad hoc member of the NCI Chemo/Dietary Prevention study section.

    Abstract

    Polyphenols may protect against intestinally mediated diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, chronic inflammation and cancer by influencing the colonic bacteria and their metabolites. We demonstrated diet-­?induced modifications to the microbiota and their metabolites in rodent models of disease and overweight humans. When sorghum brans containing 3-­? deoxyanthocyanins, condensed tannins or their combination were included in a purified diet, they almost completely prevented microbial shifts that occurred in rats given the polyphenol-­?free diet. Microbiota changes with the purified diet were suggestive of a pro-­?inflammatory state. In animals challenged with dextran sodium sulfate to initiate colitis, sorghum bran diets mitigated intestinal inflammatory tone. This response may result from the retention of Bacteroidetes and inhibition of an increase in Firmicutes in rats consuming the control diet. The condensed tannins increased Akkermansia, a microbe considered protective against metabolic diseases including diabetes. In addition to affecting the microbiota, inclusion of condensed tannins also cause a shift from rapidly digestible starch to slowly digestible and resistant starch in the diet, which likely contributed to a reduction in blood glucose levels that occurred after a meal. Similar changes in the microbiota and importantly, microbe-­?derived plasma metabolites occurred in humans consuming a cereal containing condensed tannins. Finally, rats fed these sorghum brans had fewer early colon cancer lesions, and this was associated with changes in the expression of pro-­?inflammatory mediators and regulators of apoptosis induction. Overall, our data suggest the potential for polyphenol-­?rich brans derived from sorghum to suppress multiple intestinally mediated chronic disease states that negatively affects millions of people around the world.

  • Density and value of nutrients in plant-based food products when compared with traditional animal-based food products

    University of Guelph
    Canada
    Biography

    Benjamin Bohrer is a meat scientist with training and expertise in animal and food sciences. He recently completed his graduate education in animal sciences at the University of Illinois with a focus on meat science and muscle biology and began his career as an assistant professor in food sciences at the University of Guelph. Much of his previous research has been completed on the impacts of on-farm production practices on muscle development, carcass characteristics, fresh meat quality, and processed products of pork, beef, and poultry. In the future, his research program at the University of Guelph will expand on livestock production factors affecting meat and muscle biology. In addition, a great focus will be placed on whole muscle and processed meats, with specific focus on the health of these products and innovative ways to improve quality and value of meat products.

    Abstract

    In recent years, consumers are becoming more diverse when choosing foods to consume. Specifically, there is an increase around the world in the population and percentage of people who choose to consume diets without or limited in animal-derived foods. Utilization of non-meat foods as a complete source of protein, vitamins, and minerals warrants careful consideration. This research focused on 1) comparing nutrient density, nutritional value, and cost of nutrients of meat products and non-meat foods high in protein and 2) comparing nutrient density, nutritional value, and cost of nutrients of dairy milk and plant-based milk alternatives. Twenty-five meat products (beef, pork, lamb, and poultry), six fish products, and eighteen non-meat foods were compared for nutrient composition. Seven dairy-derived milks and six plant-based milk beverages were compared for nutrient composition. Nutrient composition information was used to assign value based on nutrient density. Nutrient cost was expressed in nutrients available per US dollar and prices were assessed from the USDA economic research service and the USDA agricultural marketing service when available, and with a marketplace assessment when information was unavailable otherwise. Energy, protein, amino acid composition, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, vitamin B12, sodium, phosphorus, iron, and zinc content in protein-rich foods and milk beverages were analyzed for nutrient density and value. Individual comparisons for the cost of nutrients was generated from this dataset that will enable further research and categorization of high protein foods. Careful consideration needs to be made when replacing meat in the diet with non-meat foods, because most non-meat foods contain only 20 – 60% total protein density on an equal (raw, unprepared) serving size basis. Likewise, consideration needs to be made when replacing dairy milk with plant-based milk alternatives, as plant-based milk alternatives can range from 5 to 70% of the protein density of whole cow milk.

Food and Nutrition | Track 2: Nutritional Science | Track 03: Nutrition and Health | Track 4: Public Health Nutrition | Track 6: Human Nutrition | Track 9: Nutrition in Pregnancy and Lactation | Track 10: Nutrition and Oncology
Speaker
  • The relationship between glucose and lipid metabolism parameters and carcass characteristics in finishing cattle
    Speaker
    Benjamin M. Bohrer
    University of Guelph
    Canada
    Biography

    Benjamin Bohrer is a meat scientist with training and expertise in animal and food sciences. He recently completed his graduate education in animal sciences at the University of Illinois with a focus on meat science and muscle biology and began his career as an assistant professor in food sciences at the University of Guelph. Much of his previous research has been completed on the impacts of on-farm production practices on muscle development, carcass characteristics, fresh meat quality, and processed products of pork, beef, and poultry. In the future, his research program at the University of Guelph will expand on livestock production factors affecting meat and muscle biology. In addition, a great focus will be placed on whole muscle and processed meats, with specific focus on the health of these products and innovative ways to improve quality and value of meat products.

    Abstract

    Blood parameters in finishing cattle, such as glucose, insulin, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), and beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) can be used for a number of applications in ruminants. It has been widely speculated that differences in insulin sensitivity and free fatty acid circulation of finishing cattle may impact important carcass traits in beef, such as marbling and fat thickness. The objective of this research was to measure glucose and metabolism parameters in late-stage finishing cattle and establish the relationship of those parameters with carcass characteristics. Late-stage finishing steers (N=23; average initial BW=618±25 kg) and heifers (N=12; average initial BW=573±26 kg) were fed high-concentrate diets for a 56-d period. During this study period, non-fasted blood samples were collected at d-0, d-28, and d-56 and glucose-tolerance tests were conducted at d-21 and d-49 of the study period. Glucose-tolerance tests consisted of infusing cattle with 0.5 mL of 50% glucose solution/kg of BW after a period of 16-24 hours without feed and collecting blood for multiple time increments after the infusion. Cattle were slaughtered in a commercial facility on d-57 of the study period and carcass characteristics were measured 48-h after slaughter. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated for all parameters using the CORR procedure of SAS. Marbling was not correlated (r ? |0.25|; P ? 0.16) with glucose tolerance test parameters, including not being correlated (r ? |0.20|; P ? 0.27) with d-56 glucose, insulin, NEFA, and BHBA. Fat thickness measured at the 12th rib location was not correlated (r ? |0.30|; P ? 0.09) with glucose tolerance test parameters, including not being correlated (r ? |0.19|; P ? 0.27) with d-56 glucose, insulin, NEFA, and BHBA. Overall, glucose and lipid metabolism parameters and carcass characteristics were mostly uncorrelated in this group of late-stage finishing cattle.

  • Enhancing dairy milk CLA by tailoring rumen dynamics through dietary manipulations une 15-16, 2016 Philadelphia,
    Speaker
    M. Aasif Shahzad
    Scientific and Regulatory Affairs
    USA
    Biography

    M.A. Shahzad has expertise in developing and executing nutritional problem oriented research studies and transforming the same to farming community through organizing farmer day or farmer seminars. Nutritional modelling to feed rumen in ruminants to divert rumen dynamics towards optimum desirable aspects has opened a new window to design milk and meat with healthier properties. This will let animal food items to work more than just food.

    Abstract

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has been recognized to impart health benefits to human beings by supporting or manipulating health protecting mechanisms. Bovine milk is considered an important source of this valuable fatty acid; however, its synthesis by the dairy cow is influenced by multiple factors, among which dairy feed is one of them. Fabricating dietary nutrients to feed the dairy animal aimed to enhance its CLA has offered a tool to be used to synchronize the dietary, ruminal and cellular nutrient interaction and utilization to achieve higher CLA in milk. This article will underline how dietary feed Ingredients can alter rumen dynamics and milk biosynthesis to attain a higher CLA in dairy milk fatty acid profile. Studies indicate changes in milk CLA might be attributed to the diversity of fat sources and varying concentration of forage and concentrate. However, role of nutrients which are degraded and / or undegraded in rumen can’t be neglected. Feeding type of fat which doesn’t break in rumen and certain amino acids which break and don’t break in rumen are important tools to design milk fatty acid profile with higher CLA. Dietary fat may influence the bio hydrogenation phenomena in the rumen which has direct impact on milk fatty acid profile. Feeding type of protein which is not degraded in the rumen have been reported to enhance the milk CLA, however, this impact of dietary protein may be affected by composition and quantity of amino acids which don’t break in the rumen. Biosynthesis of milk need precursors or nutrients which dairy Animal gets form blood which reflects the existence of an isotonic equilibrium between blood and milk. This abstract review and underline the dietary interventions aimed to synchronize dietary nutrients to tailor rumen dynamics towards synthesis of nutrients or their precursors for higher milk CLA and this nutritional avenue still awaits to be capitalized for better human nutrition.

  • Nutrition and stress prevention programs in livestock/animal production: from vitamins to vitagenes
    Speaker
    Peter F Surai
    Feed-Food.Ltd
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Peter Surai has his expertise in animal and human nutrition and published a number of papers as well as two books (“Natural Antioxidants in Avian Nutrition and Reproduction”, 2002; and “Selenium in Nutrition and Health”, 2006) which became textbooks for animal nutritionists. His recent research is devoted to the development of effective strategies to fight commercially relevant stresses in livestock/animal production. He successfully transferred vitagene concept from medical sciences (Calabrese et al., 2007-2016) to animal and poultry sciences (Surai and Fisinin, 2016) and developed stress-prevention programs based on supplying vitagene-regulating nutrients to farm animals via drinking water. He has been awarded honorary professorships in nutritional biochemistry at various universities in the UK, Hungary, Bulgaria, Ukraine and become a foreign member of Russian Academy of Sciences. For the last 15 years he has been lecturing all over the world visiting more than 70 countries.

    Abstract

    Commercial livestock/animal production is associated with four major types of stresses, including environmental, technological, nutritional and internal stresses, affecting productive and reproductive performance of animals and their health status. It has been suggested that at the molecular level most stresses are associated with overproduction of free radicals and oxidative stress. Therefore, the development of the effective antioxidant solutions to decrease negative consequences of commercially-relevant stresses is an important task for animal/poultry scientists. One of such approaches is based on possibilities of modulation of vitagenes, a family of genes responsible for animal adaptation to stress. In fact, the vitagene network includes heat shock proteins (HSPs), thioredoxin system, sirtuins and superoxide dismutases (SODs) and plays a regulatory role in most important cellular processes in stress conditions. Indeed, HSPs, including heme oxygenase-1 and HSP70, are responsible for protein homeostasis in stress conditions, while the thioredoxin system is the major player in maintaining redox status of the cell involved in protein and DNA synthesis and repair as well as in regulation of expression of many important genes. Furthermore, sirtuins regulate the biological functions of various molecules post-translationally by removing acetyl groups from protein substrates ranging from histones to transcription factors and orchestrate cellular stress response by maintenance of genome integrity and protein stability. Finally, SODs belong to the first level of antioxidant defence preventing lipid and protein oxidation at the very early stages. All the aforementioned vitagenes operate in concert building a reliable system of stress detection and adequate response and are considered to be key elements in stress adaptation. Our studies clearly showed that supplying vitagene-regulating nutrients (carnitine, betaine, vitamin E, etc.) via drinking water could significantly improve adaptive ability of poultry/farm animals to commercially-relevant stresses and prevent decrease in their productive and reproductive performance. Peter F. Surai is supported by a grant of the Government of Russian Federation, Contract No. 14.W03.31.0013

  • Comparison of gut microbiota in hens of the crosses Hisex Brown and Lohmann Brown
    Speaker
    Michael N Romanov
    University of Kent
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Michael N Romanov has his expertise in avian genetics and genomics including participation in a number of national and international research projects in the areas of avian genetic diversity, gene/genome mapping, candidate genes evaluation, and comparative genomics. After years of experience in studies and teaching in both research and education institutions, he recently began leading on a project sponsored by the Government of Russian Federation. The project is aimed at developing state-of-the-art biotechnologies to assess gene expression in relation to performance and disease resistance in poultry industry, and will be done in collaboration with the Moscow State Academy of Veterinary Medicine and Biotechnology in 2017–2019.

    Abstract

    Changes in the composition of the intestinal microbiota in the cecum of poultry could have a direct impact on the quality and safety of poultry products. This study presents the results of comparative molecular genetic analysis of the cecal microbiocoenoses in laying hens of two commercial crosses, Hisex Brown and Lohmann Brown, during ontogeny. According to the analysis of overall taxonomic representation, more than 70% phylotypes determined can be attributed to three phyla, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. Less represented were Actinobacteria, Tenericutes and Fusobacteria, and the presence of significant amounts of unidentified bacteria was also revealed. During ontogenesis, birds exhibited marked changes in the ratio of the number of phylotypes and taxonomic groups of the intestinal microbiota. Chickens of both crosses went through several stages in the development of microbial communities, including a stabilization period at the age of 20 to 40 weeks, as evidenced by the biodiversity assessment using ecological indexes. The stabilization period was characterised with a significant increase in representatives of class Clostridia involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, and in bacteria with high antagonistic properties (genera Lactobacillus and Bacillus). There was also a significant reduction of number of opportunistic and pathogenic taxa, such as families Campylobacteraceae and Enterobacteriaceae, order Pseudomonadales, and phylum Tenericutes. Despite the similar conditions of housing and feeding, the Lohmann Brown hens had a maximum level of representatives of the normal flora observed by 40 weeks of age. This probably determines a smaller number of pathogens like Staphylococcus, family Campylobacteraceae, and phyla Tenericutes and Fusobacteria found by 40 to 60 weeks of age and greater stability of intestinal microbiocoenosis in the Lohmann Brown birds as compared with the Hisex Brown chickens.

  • The Ghost Aim in Medical research - Preventing fattening/insulin resistance/overall inflammation
    Speaker
    Mario Ciampolini
    Università di Firenze
    Italy
    Biography

    Mario Ciampolini is a retired professor from Università di Firenze, Dept Pediatrics, directed the Gastroenterology Research Unit, a third level referral center in the department of Pediatrics of the University of Florence (Meyer hospital) for 40 years. He worked at the Cornell University for a joined research with the University of Florence on energy expenditure in children. Three students came from Amsterdam Medical Center to learn “Recognizing Hunger” he made the first diagnoses of celiac disease in Tuscany and published 130 scientific articles, about 40 in international Press.

    Abstract

    In the world, physicians more and more appreciate findings on preprandial hunger arousal and less and less deny their validity in my country (Tuscany). People taking food after perceiving signals of hunger (Initial Hunger Meal Pattern, IHMP) prevent fattening/insulin resistance that causes an overall inflammation, diseases like asthma, vascular and malignancy risks. I wonder why scientists denied value to my endeavor. The division had a start when I read the Handbook of Physiology of the American Society for Physiology, in 1967. I was charged with the treatment of malnutrition and diarrhea. I read the handbook to become aware about mucosal digestion and absorption. At that time, these points had to be diagnosed to treat malnourished children. Before beginning any research, a dynamic, reversible condition seemed instead to operate in chronic diarrhea children and had to be found. I read that 50% - 60% or more immune cells of the human body reside in the mucosa of small intestine (Mowat, 1987, 44; Brandtzaeg et al., 1989; Abrams, 1977). Bacteria grow in the small and large intestine in dependence on nutrients, mainly those nutrients that produce energy availability (sugars, carbohydrates, amino-acids, fats (Hungate, 1967). Thus bacterial growth is proportionate to positive energy balance. I studied bacteria number on the intestinal mucosa in time after last meal. A longer interval from the meal produced a decrease in bacteria number. Thus I concluded that meal absorption develops in a competition between mucosa cells and bacteria (Ciampolini et al. 1996, 2000). The conflictual nature of mucosal absorption has been confirmed (Cooper, Siadaty, 2014; Mccoy, Köller, 2015). I personally provided many demonstrations that current meal pattern provides a lot of illnesses. I add here another proof: The many successful cures of gastrointestinal pathologies by IHMP suggest that the theory used for recovery was objective. In this view, the question: ”what food provokes cancer?” is absurd. Tumor heterogeneity is a problem for cancer therapeutics. I am pleased by this information. Malignancy needs to be prevented through a better maintenance of immune system. Health follows the relation between energy intake and expenditure. Both the existence of hundreds or thousands of bacterial species in intestine and the existence of a local huge immune reaction in intestinal mucosa sustained the conflictual view. Reading the Handbook isolated myself in a Medical World that was unaware of microbiology. Physicians saw improvements in the children I treated, but did not understand the intestinal mechanisms that were far away from their observation. They repeated: Ciampolini is alone in his statements. Now, hundreds of printing houses, and hundreds of scientific Journals ask me for submitting articles. I am alone and cannot produce hundred articles that are new and different each other. The growing number of electronic Journals created a “Babel” condition that may be useful for commercial exploitation (or for maintenance of power in some editors) but not for the “ghost aim” of improving awareness about the upsurge of malignant and vascular risks, not to meet the expectation of one billion of malnourished people. Do we have to go on in the illusion of promoting knowledge by printing ten similar articles instead of one? I would prefer a grouping of Journals on basic assumptions: the study of contagion, the study of energy balance, the study of essential nutrients, the study of genetics. A confrontation inside groups is necessary to decide either the opening of new research fields or the fusion of similar Journals. Publishing on Health requires an absence of conflicts of interest. This becomes more and more difficult. I was stopped in my institute just because I was unable at constructing a profit from my findings. Individuals devoid of conflicts of interest are precious and rare in a complex world founded on the commerce of innovation and research. Heads of Journals might join together in an endeavor for the construction of a new order. Having forwarded this claim for a shared action, I expect that somebody will respond to my address to discuss chances. The first step within the ghost aim should be the creation of a consensus among scientists on the pathogenic principal mechanism(s). The second step would be much easier: teaching the consented mechanism to the population. Other mechanisms might better function. This small piece is intended to be published in many Journals that requested a writing from mine. The piece is sufficient to show a valid although intolerable situation.

  • Eco-efficiency: Application in the university restaurants on Brazil
    Speaker
    Virgílio José Strasburg
    Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul
    Brazil
    Biography

    Virgílio José Strasburg is a professor of Nutrition at the UFRGS (Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul) and also works at the Hospital de Clínicas of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Graduated in Nutrition, Master in Collective Health and Ph.D. in Environmental Quality. It develops research related to environmental impacts, especially in the segment of production of meals for collectivities. Its scope of investigation contemplates questions related to waste management, besides the theme of the water footprint of the menus. He was the first researcher to develop the concept of ecoefficiency applied to the food production segment.

    Abstract

    Meal production for communities is an important activity in the service segment. The concept of eco-efficiency (EE) prioritizes the more efficient use of materials and energy, combining economic and environmental performance. In this context, the objective of this study was to propose and apply a procedure for evaluating environmental performance from the perspective of EE, for the foodservice segment. The procedure developed was applied to measure the EE relationship of supplies used in food service in five university restaurants (URs) at a Brazilian federal public university with secondary data from 2012. The calculations for assessing the EE included the selection of foods of animal and plant origin according to ABC analysis. Considering that one of the purposes of providing meals is to give energy support to their users, the approach used for calculating EE included the provision of energy in kilocalories and financial values in relation to the environmental impacts upon which the variables of the water footprint and amount of wastes generated from the foods used were selected. The five URs served 1,532,588 meals in 2012, and the average served varied from 481 to 3141 meals per day, according to the size of each restaurant. The EE in the relationship between kilocalories and kilograms regarding the environmental impacts of the foods used exhibited values that varied from 0.283 to 1.071. When calculating the EE that considered the provision of kilocalories and financial values regarding the environmental impacts, the values varied from 0.091 to 0.322. In both measurements, the best results were obtained by UR 5 and UR 3, that respectively which had the lowest and highest annual average of meals served. The procedure developed and proposed proved to be adequate for evaluating the environmental performance in terms of EE among restaurants with the same type of service.

  • Effectiveness of a 16-month multi-component and environmental school-based intervention for recovery of poor income overweight/obese children and adolescents: study protocol of The Health Multipliers Program
    Speaker
    Pollyanna Fernandes Patriota
    Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP)
    Brazil
    Biography

    Pollyanna Fernandes Patriota is a Nutritionist and a professor of a Federal University of Triangulo Mineiro on the area of Public Health, Phd student in Nutrition on the Federal University of São Paulo (Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP). Has experience on teaching, research and extension on the areas of Nutrition and Public Health, maternal and child health, childhood obesity and composes the Group of Research “Nutrition and poverty” on the Institute of Advanced Studies on the University of São Paulo (IEA - USP).

    Abstract

    Excess of weight is a serious public health problem in almost all countries afflicting people from different ages and socioeconomic levels. Studies have indicated the need for developing strategies of treatment that intervene directly in the obesogenic environment. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-component and environmental school-based intervention, lasting 16 months, for the recovery of the nutritional status of low-income children and adolescents with overweight/ obesity. Methods/ Study design The study is conducted by the Center for Recovery and Nutritional Education (CREN) in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. Two schools located in poor neighborhoods were selected for the intervention. The intervention duration is from March 2016 to June 2017. The participants are 791 students aged 8 to 12 that make up the universe of students of this age in the two schools. At the beginning of the intervention anthropometric measurements were carried out to assess nutritional status. One school was chosen for convenience to be the control group and the other to be the experimental group. The intervention of the experimental group (n = 438) consists of the following weekly activities at school: psychological counseling in groups, theoretical/practical nutrition workshops and supervised physical education classes. In addition, theoretical and practical educational activities are held regularly for parents, teachers and cooks. Students with excess of weight (>1 BMI –for-age Z score, n = 138) underwent clinical and nutritional care periodically in outpatient care at CREN. Students enrolled in the control group (n = 353) participated in psychological counseling groups and theoretical/practical nutrition workshops for 6 months that took place in the school environment with the whole classroom for motivational purpose. In the following 10 months the students with excess of weight from the control group (n = 125) were invited to attend the routine outpatient care at CREN. Discussion:This study is the first to assess the effectiveness of a multi-component and environmental school-based intervention for the recovery of low-income overweight/obese children and adolescents. If positive, the results will demonstrate the feasibility for the recovery of excess of weight in populations in similar conditions and age.

  • Malnutrition in Disabled Children
    Speaker
    Ibrahim Abdullah Mohammed Refaei
    Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Humanitarian City
    Saudi Arabia
    Biography

    Ibrahim Abdullah Mohammed Refaei Pediatric Clinical Dietitian and Member of National Newborn Screening Program of MOH - KSA to prevent Disability (Saudi Metabolic Nutrition). Pediatric Dietitian in (Early Intervention program at Sultan Bin Abdelaziz Humanitarian City – Riyadh – KSA). He has published many research articles in National and International Journals.

    Abstract

    Children with special needs suffer from malnutrition due to lack of nutrients necessary for child development and physical and cognitive development. It is therefore necessary to intervene in order to overcome the problems that malnutrition may cause to address the problems related to malnutrition early, which contributes to improving the quality of life and preserving the remaining physical and mental potential and try to develop them to be healthier in the future.

  • Low-calorie diet and exercise in management of obesity, affect the overall health condition. SUCCESSFUL STORRY
    Speaker
    Suhair Abdalla Khalil Abdalla
    King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center
    Saudi Arabia
    Biography

    Suhair Abdalla Khalil Abdallah has completed her PhD in Clinical Nutrition from Ahfad University for Women, Sudan. She is a Clinical Dietitian at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. She has long experience of 18 years in clinical nutrition field.

    Abstract

    The rising prevalence of obesity and its associated morbidity and mortality are placing significant strain on Saudi's health-care system. The present case study examines the weight loss attempts of a 53-year-old male patient weighing 200 kg (body mass index 57.3 kg/m2) in the setting of an acute hospital outpatient clinic. The patient is known case of morbid obesity, DM, HTN on medications, gout, secondary infertility, and sleep apnea on C pap. The patient was referred to nutrition clinic for his weight control, as case of secondary infertility and uncontrols diabetes, hypertension beside other health problems related to his obesity. Because of the need for rapid weight reduction, a novel inpatient approach to weight loss was adopted, using low-calorie diet (LCD) and regular exercise (45-60 minutes daily). The LCD intervention was prescribed in conjunction with medical management, regular physical activity, and dietary counseling. Serial anthropometric and biochemical measurements were obtained throughout the treatment period. The patient achieved a 90-kg weight loss (45% initial body weight) over a ten-month of follow up. Improvements in obesity-related co morbidities and the patient's overall health condition were also observed during his follow up. Total weight loss at 10 months of follow up 90 kg (45% initial body weight), improved in Hba1c to normal reference range and stopped OHG, Controlled HTN pt back to normal Blood Pressure reading and stopped medication, sleep apnea management and no C.pap use. Pregnancy occurred. The use of LCD with exercise in a motivated individual in a controlled hospital outpatient clinic, along with input from the multidisciplinary team, resulted in substantial and sustained weight loss with improved health outcomes. In conclusion obesity is preventable and treatable. LCD and physical exercise can produce weight loss that can be maintained and help in improve the overall health of obese patient.

  • Extraction and characterization of pectin from banana (Musa Acuminata × Balbisiana) peel with different percentage of sugar
    Speaker
    Chek Zaini Hassan
    Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia
    Malaysia
    Biography

    Madya Chek Zaini Hassan is working as a Professor at Department Food Biotechnoloy Faculty Science and Technology, Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia. She completed her Bachelors of Science in Foodservice Management (Hons.), University of New Haven, Connecticut, USA 1981, Masters of Science in Human Nutrition and Foodservice Management, University of Nebraska, USA in 1987. She is worked as a Dean of Faculty of Hotel and Tourism, UiTM (1093-1998), Human Resource and Training Manager in INTEKMA Resort (UiTM) from (1999-2002), Director of Research Management (USIM) from 2009-2011; Research interest: Human Nutrition and Health, Foodservice, Product Development , Bakery Science and Technology, Beverage Technology.

    Abstract

    Pectin was extracted from banana (Musa acuminata × balbisiana) peels by traditional method. Banana peel is an underutilized waste produced from banana processing in Malaysia. The suitable ratio of banana peel to water for pectin extraction was 1:0.8 as it was proved to successfully produced gel with addition of sugar and lemon juice. Four formulations of gels with different percentage of sugar (20.8%, 27.7%, 41.6% and 48.6%) were analyzed to study the effect of sugar on the characteristic of gels in terms of spreadibility, tenderness, colour, texture, water activity and moisture content of gels. The spreadibility of gel was determined using Line Spread test. As the formulation went up by the increasing percentage of sugar, the distance of gel spread was decrease. Gel tenderness was determined in terms of percentage sag and it showed a significantly decrease (P?0.05) as the percentage of sugar increase from formulation 1 to 4. The colour and texture analysis showed a significant different between each formulations. Both water activity and moisture content of gels decrease as the formulation went up by the increasing percentage of sugar. Watermelon jam added with gel form from banana peel was made to test the ability of gel.

  • Carbohydrates counting as a Medical Nutrition therapy for Diabetes Mellitus
    Speaker
    M. B. Agieb
    Saudi German Hospital
    Saudi Arabia
    Biography

    Maha Bushra Hamed was born in Sudan 1972 and has been residing in Saudi Arabia since 1995. She holds a PhD in Human Nutrition from Ahfad University for Women in Sudan 2009, joining the Saudi-German Hospital Group as a head of the Dietetic Department in 2001. She has taught a number of courses on food and Nutrition at Al-Batterjee Medical College. Her current concern and interests include nutrition therapy for obesity and diabetes in both adult and adolescents.

    Abstract

    Carbohydrates have the greatest effect on blood-sugar levels when digested . around 90-100% of the carbohydrate converts to sugar (glucose) within 15 minutes to 1.5 hours. comparing with Only 58% of protein, and less than 10% of fat, are converted into sugar within several hours after consumption. Counting carbohydrates is a meal plan that involves matching your insulin dose to the amount of carbohydrates Insulin to carbohydrate ratio is a guide for determining how much insulin needed as a bolus dose to help the body process the amount of carbohydrate consuming in a meal. The magic number is "15" for counting carbohydrates (15 grams of CHO = one carbohydrate choice or serving). As an initiation for this method An "average" might be 1 unit of insulin for every 10 or 15 grams of CHO for an adult, or 1 unit for every 20 to 30 grams for a school-age child, depending on the calculation method used and it will be adjusted as food intake recorded and matching with blood sugar monitoring Infants and toddlers need individualized determinations by the diabetes care team. Fiber and alcoholic sugar have special consideration in this method because both of them had an effect on blood sugar absorption which affect blood sugar levels

  • Nutritional management of polycystic ovary syndrome
    Speaker
    Mohamed Radwan
    CR AODA
    Egypt
    Biography

    Mohamed Radwan is a physician with a bachelor degree in Medicine from The Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University. He presented his Assay on “The health hazards among Children due to the use of food additives” for the fulfillment of The Master Degree in Pediatrics. Dr. Radwan specialized in Weight management and, acquired The MS Degree in Nutritional Sciences. With his 7 year experience as the head of the nutritional and obesity unit in The 6th of October University Hospital, he was able to meet many cases from the university’s students who suffer from PCOs and Overweight, therefore, enabling him -with the assistance of the Gynecology department- to study more and focus on this common syndrome.

    Abstract

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is becoming very common among girls from ages 14 to 21 years old alongside women in their childbearing period. A combination of menstrual irregularities, overweight or obesity, insulin resistance (type2 diabetes) and symptoms of virilization are characteristics of these cases. A multidisciplinary team should be involved in managing these cases and may consist of a Gynecologist, endocrinologist, nutritionist and a psychologist. The role of nutritionists is crucial in these cases in weight reduction and nutritional management. It is mandatory to present some questions that may help in expanding further our understanding of the nutritional management of this syndrome, such as; 1) Is it an easy process to reduce weight of PCO patients? 2) What is the most suitable nutritional plan for these cases? 3) Is it successful to use one diet plan for all patients or a specific plan tailored for each patient? Based on these questions, we will summarize the medical nutritional therapy and weight management in PCO patients and highlight the best eating plan and dietary composition in the treatment of these women. We will also discuss the role of dieticians in treating PCOs and overcoming the Challenges these women face.

  • Protein intake in Infancy: Difference between needs and supply
    Speaker
    Naguib A bdelreheim
    University of Sharjah
    United Arab Emirates
    Biography

    Dr. Naguib’s professional experience also includes academic appointments with the University of Sharjah, UAE, as an Assistant Professor of Paediatrics in the College of Medicine and Health Sciences. He is also the chairman of the hospital CME Committee at UHS and provides leadership, coordination and direction to both internal and external CME programs. Dr. Naguib earned his medical degree from Cairo University, Egypt. He completed his master’s degree from Ain Sham University, Egypt and Degree of Doctor in Pediatrics from the same university.He also has a postgraduate diploma in diabetes from Leicester University, UK.

    Abstract

    • Of the 50 or so known essential macronutrients and micronutrients, protein is by far the most important for human development and health. Protein is a major structural component of all cells in the body. It functions as enzymes, hormones and transport carriers. Protein is also required for synthesis of nucleic acids, hormones, vitamins , and others. Recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of protein is the safe level of intake which will satisfy the protein needs. Both protein excess and deficiency in infancy can lead to disease. Excessive protein intake leads to increased blood concentration of non-metabolised amino acids, particularly insulin-releasing amino acids: valine, leucine, isoleucine and threonine . According to the “Early Protein Hypothesis”, excessive protein intake in early life “programmes” a tendency towards increased early weight gain and formation of fat cells (adipogenic activity).Chronic protein deficiency can result in faltering or stunting which can lead to impaired brain development, lower IQ, weakened immune systems, and greater risk of diseases like diabetes and cancer later in life. • While breast milk provides the exact amount and quality of protein in the first year, Formula milk usually contain high protein quantity to compensate for the protein quality required for proper growth and development. Because of improper quantity and quality of protein unmodified Cow’s Milk is not recommended for infants by all societies like AAP, ESPGHAN and WHO.

  • The effect of a zinc-algal polysaccharide complex on preventing contamination of food emulsions
    Speaker
    Irit Dvir
    Sapir Academic College
    Israel
    Biography

    Irit Dvir completed her Ph.D. at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel in 1999. She is an expert in the study of algae and its uses in the food industry and as a dietary supplement. Currently Dr. Dvir is a Senior Lecturer and head of the Chemistry and Life Sciences program at Sapir Academic College, Israel. She is a member of the Council of Young Israeli Entrepreneurs and is always looking for original and innovative research projects. She has published papers in reputed international journals. Much of her work is interdisciplinary and extends beyond red microalgae to include nutrition and food manufacturing. Development of novel functional foods that can positively impact health and prevent or treat metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity.

    Abstract

    The potential applicability of algae as a bioresource for the sustainable production of foods, cosmetics and pharmaceutical products is virtually unlimited. The exploitation of algal bioresources is timely in light of the current market trend toward a greater reliance on natural products. Among the principal algal sources are red microalgae, which produce unique biochemicals including novel sulfated polysaccharides (PS). In recent years, Arad laboratory has developed the biotechnology for the production of valuable products based on red microalgae with an emphasis on isolated sulfated polysaccharides found in the algal cell wall. The combination of the diverse biological activities of these novel molecules (e.g. antiviral, antioxidant, anti -inflammatory and soothing properties), with their distinctive properties (i.e., composition, structure, rheology and extreme stability), can be exploited across a vast range of applications in the pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and food industries. The red microalga, Porphyridium sp., is encapsulated within a negatively charged PS that has unique rheological characteristics which make it an excellent emulsifier. The PS was shown to act as a platform for metal incorporation, taking advantage of its ion-exchange capabilities and its negative charge. In the current study we investigated the combination of emulsifying and antibacterial activities of a Zn-PS complex. It was shown that dairy emulsions and oil-in water emulsions were stable in low concentrations of Zn-PS complex (<0.2% and <500 ppm Zn). The Zn-PS complex was also shown to have higher effect on inhibition of bacterial growth when compared with the algal polysaccharide alone. These results suggest that the Zn-PS complex has significant potential as a novel emulsifier that also inhibits food contamination. Overall, the data support the potential of using functional sulfated polysaccharides from red microalgae to stabilize emulsions and to act as an antibacterial agent in food applications. As such, the sulfated polysaccharide of the red microalga Porphyridium sp. is of particular interest. The results of this study may hold important implications for the possible utilization of red microalgal polysaccharides as a novel additive in food manufacturing.

  • Some hematological studies in broiler chicks as affected by using dried distiller’s grains with solubles in their diets
    Speaker
    Shaker A. Abd EL-Latif
    Minia University
    Egypt
    Biography

    Shaker A. Abd EL-Latif has completed his Ph.D. at the age of 33 years from Minnisota and Minia Universities through Channel system. He has published more than 52 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of repute.

    Abstract

    A total number of 256 unsexed, one day old Arbor acres broiler chicks were used to study the effect of using distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) at levels (0, 5, 10, 15%) treated without or with enzyme (avizyme 1500) at level 0 and 1gm / kg diet on some blood parameter of broiler chicks. At the 6thweek of age, blood samples were collected from wing vein of four chicks from each experimental groups to study some blood hematological study. Birds fed dietary 15% DDGS recorded the highest (P? 0.01) values of RBC's, PCV%, Hb, MCH and MCHC compared to other treatments. The greatest (P? 0.01) value of MCHC was recorded for birds fed dietary 5% and 15% DDGS. While, birds fed 15% DDGS recorded the highest (P? 0.01) value of PCV%. Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration increased by using DDGS at all levels compared to control group. Adding enzymes to broiler diet improved (P? 0.01) Hb and MCV values. Key words- DDGS, enzyme, blood parameter, broiler chicks INTRODUCTION The principle reason for broiler producers to select dietary ingredients is economy, because feed represents approximately 70% of the live production cost. In feed formulation, nutritionists consider a wide range of ingredients and attempt to develop feed formulas that provide the desired level of nutrients at minimum cost. In formulating diets the nutritionist must consider not only cost and nutrient content of the ingredient, but also the quantity available for use and consistency of supply (Wang et al., 2007). Therefore, many attempts are usually made to reduce feed cost without adversely affecting performance and/or product safety by using some Un-traditional ingredients in the diets. In developing countries, there is a shortage of both energy sources and feedstuffs with acceptable protein content for animal production. In view of the worldwide demand for additional feed sources. Moreover, enzymes were used most commonly to aid digestion of diets where improvements are seen in dry matter digestibility. There is also current interest in enzymes designed specifically to improve soybean meal digestibility (Lesson and Summers, 2005). Recently, increased emphasis on ethanol production as biofuel in the United States and other countries has and will continue to lead to significant increase in the amount of dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) available to the feed industry (Batal and Dale, 2003). DDGS has been a by-product of the beverage industry, for the most part, with several different grains used in the fermentation process. In the late 1930s, feed producers began to incorporate DDGS into livestock rations, but before this, it was a by-product with limited value (Scott, 1970). The beverage industry was not the only source of DDGS; ethanol plants also produced this ingredient. Production of ethanol from 100 kg of corn using the dry-milling method produces approximately 34.4 kg of ethanol, 34.0 kg of carbon dioxide and 31.6 kg of distillers dried grains with solubles (Renewable Fuels Association, 2005).

  • Nutritional profile of Diabetes Asian Indians with Low Body Mass Index: What are the unmet needs?
    Speaker
    Mini Joseph
    Christian Medical College
    India
    Biography

    Mini Joseph is pursuing post-doctoral research the field of Endocrinology Nutrition at Christian Medical College, Vellore, South India. This is a 2700 bedded tertiary care missionary hospital catering to the needs of patients from neighbouring States and countries. She has done extensive studies on the eating behaviour and nutritional profile of Lean Diabetes patients and in the field of Sports Nutrition. Her interests lies in looking at the nutrient adequacy of patients with Fibro-calculus pancreatitis diabetes, tropical calculus pancreatitis, gestational diabetes mothers, Type 1 Diabetes mellitus and bariatric patients (BMI >35) with endocrine disorders. She has presented papers on the above subjects at various International conferences. She is a Lecturer and teaches Nutrition to graduates, post-graduates, doctors and paramedical in hospital and in a Government educational Institute (Government College for Women, Kerala, India).She is involved in patient education and organising self-help groups.

    Abstract

    Statement of the problem: There is paucity of data on nutritional intake in low BMI (BMI) Asian Indians with Diabetes. Aim: To study the difference in nutrient pattern in lean Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) and Fibro-calcific Pancreatic Diabetes (FCPD) patients. Methodology: This cross-sectional study consisted of T1DM (n = 40) and FCPD patients (n = 20) who were gender and BMI matched Nutritional data was collected using 24 hour recall method and food diary. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for lipid profile, serum creatinine, glycosylated hemoglobin, albumin, calcium and vitamin D. Stool samples were analyzed for pancreatic elastase. Percentage analysis, Independent sample t test and Pearson Coefficient Correlation were used to analyze the data. P value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Findings: The FCPD patients had a significantly lower vitamin D status compared to the TIDM group (p=0.035) however, hemoglobin, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins, creatinine, albumin and calcium were similar between the groups. Further, FCPD patients had a significant higher intake of fat (p=0.039), fibre (p=0.000), calcium (p=0.047), phosphorous (p=0.035), and niacin (p=0.001) and calories from fat (p=0.047). The TIDM group had a significantly higher intake of thiamine (p=0.047) and carbohydrates (p=0.014). Conclusion: TIDM and FCPD groups have similar dietary pattern with deficit in fibre, calories, macronutrients and micronutrients. Malabsorption and poor glycaemic control in FCPD patients can be attributed to a higher dietary fat intake. A balanced diet can ensure better glycemic control.

  • Breastfeeding at maternity hospital and infant mortality in Brazil
    Speaker
    Marina Ferreira Rea
    Osvaldinete Lopes De Oliveira Silva
    Brazil
    Biography

    Marina Ferreira Rea is Brazilian and born on 19 Feb 1946, physician, Bachelor's at Medicine from University of São Paulo (1972), master's at Collective Health from University of São Paulo (1981) and doctorate at Collective Health from University of São Paulo (1989), POST DOC in Human Nutrition at Columbia Univ. NY, USA; Member of Pediatric Society São Paulo, Dept. of Breastfeeding. Specialist in Human Lactation by Wellstart International She has experience in Nutrition, focusing on breastfeeding, acting on the following subjects: BREASTFEEDING, BABY-FRIENDLY HOSPITAL INITIATIVE, CODE, INFANT FOOD AND HIV, PLANNING PROGRAMMES ON MCH. Consultant on human lactation in different countries for WHO, PAHO, UNICEF. Editor of Breastfeeding Briefs. Articles and books published. Active member of IBFAN since 1981, and has founded IBFAN Brazil in 1983, a network present in 17 states (provinces) of this country. Member of IBFAN Global Coordinating Committee. Medical officer at WHO- Geneva, 1989-1992 – coordinated the Breastfeeding Programme at the Control of Diarrhea Diseases Division. She retired from Research Institute in Sao Paulo, where she worked for more than 30 years in MCH and Nutrition. Active researcher at Brazilian Center for Analysis and Planning (CEBRAP) and at Post –graduate Studies on Nutrition in Public Health

    Abstract

    Breastfeeding should be implemented from birth, as it contributes to the reduction of infant mortality. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the number of deaths potentially avoided by the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) in Brazil, this enables strategies that allow breastfeeding exclusively from birth. METHODS: The analysis consisted of: estimating the effectiveness of BFHI in breastfeeding in the first hour of life (BF1h), the exclusive breastfeeding in infants 0-5 months (EBF) and of any breastfeeding. The potential impact of BFHI on the reduction of infant mortality mediated by increased breastfeeding was estimated by subtracting the prevalence of each breastfeeding indicator for both BFH and NBFH born babies. For this purpose, the Population Attributable Fraction (PAF) of breastfeeding was used for the following indicators: late neonatal mortality mediated by non-breastfeeding in the first hour of life, all-cause mortality in infants less than 6m and mortality due to infection in infants under 6 months; The latter two, mediated by non-breastfeeding. The PAF was obtained for children born in BFH and NBFH, using the prevalence of non-breastfeeding and the estimated relative risks. Finally, it was estimated the number of deaths potentially preventable by the BFHI, considering the data on infant mortality occurred in 2008. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 18,929 children under 6 months of age; Of these 34.1% were born in BFH. The BFHI promoted a statistically significant increase in the 3 indicators of BF: 11.7% in BF1h; 7.9% in EBF and 2.1% in any breastfeeding. If all children were born in BFH, the fraction of mortality attributable to non-breastfeeding (PAF) would be lower, potentially avoiding 4.2% of late neonatal mortality, 3.5% of all-cause mortality, and 4.2% mortality from infection. CONCLUSION: BFHI improves breastfeeding and contributes to a reduction in mortality.

  • Consumer knowledge on salt information of 18 years and above consumers at Tshififi rural community, Vhembe district Thulamela municipality Limpopo province.
    Speaker
    Mbhatsani Hlekani Vanessa
    University of Venda
    South Africa
    Biography

    Hlekani Vanessa Mbhatsani is a Lecturer of Nutrition at the University of Venda and a registered Nutritionist with the Health Professional Council of South Africa. She has received both her undergraduate BSc and MSc in Public Nutrition at the University of Venda. As a Post-graduate student she was given an opportunity to perform Research and Teaching Assistant functions. This provoked the teaching and research interest that led her to applying for the lecturing position after completion of her MSc. To enhance her teaching responsibilities, she persuaded a Post graduate Diploma in Higher Education at Rhodes University. She is currently studying towards her PhD with Stellenbosch University. Her research areas of interest include micronutrients, role of indigenous foods in health and nutrition, child nutrition and food security. She is a co-author of chapter six in a book titled “Community Nutrition for South Africa; A Right Based Approach”. She has presented her work both in national and international conferences and only published a few articles in peer reviewed journals

    Abstract

    Objectives: The main aim of the study was to determine consumer’s knowledge on salt information. Methodology: The study design was descriptive and exploratory. The research type was both qualitative and quantitative in nature. The researcher conveniently selected one individual male or female who was not a visitor, but a villager during data correction. A researcher administered questionnaire was used to collect data using the local language. Anthropometric measurements of weight and height were taken as well as blood pressure. Data was analysed using Microsoft excel 2010 and descriptive statistics were used to interpret the information gathered and presented in the form of tables and figures. Results A majority 95% of consumers were unaware of the recommended daily intake of salt, only 55 knew. Few 16.7% of consumers indicated that they check salt content on food products before buying. Majority 83.35 do not check. Only 26.6% of consumers accurately interpreted nutrition information on food products. While majority 84.4% were unable to interpret. Majority of were overweight and obese were 75%. Only 255 of them were normal. Majority of consumers 69.9% of Consumers were normal, while 30.1% were hypertensive. Conclusion It is concluded that consumers have average knowledge on salt information based on the researcher’s discretion. In addition more female consumers were overweight and obese as opposed to their male counterparts. However, a majority of consumers had normal blood pressure.

  • Infant feeding practices and anthropometric status of children aged 3 to 24 months of Nkowankowa township, Mopani District
    Speaker
    Mondlane NAF
    University of Venda
    South Africa
    Biography

    Mondlane NAF is working at the Department of Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Venda, South Africa. He had published many research articles in National and International Journals.

    Abstract

    Introduction: World Health Organization indicated that infant feeding is crucial for growth and development. WHO estimated that 800 000 death amongst children under five years can be prevented annually if infants are breastfeeding. Objectives: To determine infant feeding practices and anthropometric status of children aged 3 to 24 months. Study Design: A descriptive survey was done. The researcher described infant feeding practice and anthropometric status of children aged 3 to 24 months. Breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices were determined by questionnaire, a quantified food frequency questionnaire was used to determine the usual food intake. Setting/participants: Participants included 240 caregivers with children age 3-24 months from Nkowankowa Township, Mopani district in Limpopo Province. Results: More than half of infants (56.7%) were males and 43.3% were females. 85% initiated breastfeeding immediately after delivery. 42.4% were giving infant formula milk. First solid foods given were maize-meal soft porridge (73.3%). During visit, 75% of the children were of normal weight, 13.3% were mildly underweight, 3.3% were underweight, and 6.7% were severely underweight while 1.7% were at possible risk of growth problems. Conclusion: Inappropriate feeding practices should be addressed. Interventions should emphasize the importance of exclusive breastfeeding and correct the introduction of complementary feeding since the rate of exclusive breastfeeding is still low when compared to developed countries.

  • Prevalence of Obesity and its Association with Diet among 13-years Old Omani School Children
    Speaker
    Halima Nasser Hareth Al.Dhali
    Sultan Qaboos University
    Oman
    Biography

    Halima Al.Dhali , 6th year medical student . I have interest in studying Obesity and its global effects in human health . My passion is to decrease its prevalence among new generation and looking forward for healthy generation who can serve their countries efficiently . I have published one study about obesity among children and planning to conduct more studies .

    Abstract

    Obesity is a global health disorder and the WHO considers obesity as the most serious non-communicable disease worldwide and is closely related to improper diet. All age groups are affected but the problem becomes worse when children are affected (1). Obesity in children is defined as BMI > 95th percentile as defined in the Expert Committee Recommendations (2). In the US childhood obesity is about 11 % overweight is about 25 % . Obesity prevalence worldwide is on the increase since 1970 especially indeveloped countries (3). A WHO report stated that , approximately 58% of diabetes mellitus, 21% of ischemic heart disease and 8–42% of cancer globally were attributable to obesity (4).These diseases can affect children and adolescents. Obesity also increase cardiovascular disease and increases the risks of all-cause mortality. Obese children are also more likely to become overweight in adulthood than are lean children (5). Approximately one half of overweight adolescents and over one-third of overweight children remain obese in adulthoods (6). Results : The findings of this study provide evidence that unhealthy dietary habits were appear to be associated with obesity in this group of Omani adolescents. Gender Females Males Normal 60 66.67% 60 54.55% Obese 30 33.33% 50 45.45 Total 90 100 % 110 100% CONCLUSION The findings of our study provide evidence that unhealthy dietary habits were prevalent in both genders. Therefore, the promotion of healthy lifestyles should be a national public health priority. In addition, there is an urgent need for national policy promoting healthy eating among Omani adolescents.

  • Assessment of dietary intake and prevalence of malnutrition in children aged 9-14 years in private boarding primary schools in Kampala, Uganda.
    Speaker
    Lynnth Turyagyenda
    International health sciences university
    Uganda
    Biography

    Lynnth Turyagyenda has completed her Master’s in Public health (MPH) at the age of 26 years from international health sciences university, Uganda following a BSc in Food science and technology from Makerere University, Kampala-Uganda. Currently working as the clinical nutritionist for Uganda-Case Western Reserve University, Research Collaboration.

    Abstract

    From the nutritional status, the majorities were normal however, there was a high prevalence of stunting (29.7%). This indicates continuing chronic malnutrition in children. This is an underlying cause of over half of child deaths in many developing countries. Malnutrition affects the physical, mental, social wellbeing and child development. It is also associated with lower enrolment and poor cognitive functioning among children attending school. Malnutrition (under and over nutrition) and related health problems such as obesity and cardiovascular diseases can be prevented through modification of lifestyle e.g., exercising and having a balanced diet. However, if this is not done, malnutrition puts a strain on the already scarce resources in terms of treatment of CVD and other related health issues. A malnourished child becomes a malnourished adult hence reducing productivity overall. This study focused on identifying dietary patterns, prevalence of malnutrition and associated factors hence provides a basis for policy makers in formulating health and nutrition policies and programs nationwide and encourages commitment to the development and enforcement of school feeding programs in Uganda.

  • Antioxidant Activity of Gnetum Bucholzianum in Wistar Rats
    Speaker
    Oparaocha Evangeline Tochi
    Federal University of Technology
    Nigeria
    Biography

    Sis. (Dr) Evangeline Oparaocha a Nigerian of Imo State extraction joined the Department of Public Health Technology in September, 2004 as a senior lecturer. She rose to the rank of a Reader in October, 2008, and is awaiting the final approval of her promotion to a professor. From May 1997 to July 2004, she lectured in the Department of Biological Sciences of the Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Abia State, having taught for some years at Fatima College, Ikire, Osun State. Her postgraduate studies were done at the prestigious University of Ibadan, Nigeria, while her undergraduate studies were at the Rivers State, University of Science and Technology, Port Harcourt. In 2005 she went to Harvard School of Public Health for a certificate course in Ethical Issues in International Health Research. Her classical researches have been in the area of malaria control through the use of local herbs. Sr (Dr) Oparaocha has travelled extensively for conferences and workshops overseas and within the country. She is a happy and friendly nun and has won three awards from her students for academic excellence, hard work and integrity. Outside the academic world she is a poet, a musician and a dramatist.

    Abstract

    The antioxidant activity the leaf extract of Gnetum bucholzianum was evaluates using 20 wistar rats which were divided into 2groups of 10rats per group. Group 1 served as control while Group II was administered with the extract of Gnetum bucholzianum at dose of 100mg for 14days. The result obtained showed that treatment with extract of Gnetumbucholzianum at doses of 100mg/kg caused a significant (P<0.05) change in antioxidant activities of the treated rats when compared with the control. This result suggests that the leaf extract of Gnetum bucholzianum could probably serve as a potential natural product for treatment of ailment associated with oxidative stress. Hence, consumption of Gnetum bucholzianum which the local people use for preparing soup has beneficial effect.

  • Studies on heavy metals of street foods in traffic congested areas of Gboko metropolis, Benue state, Nigeria.
    Speaker
    Kunle Oni
    Federal University Oye Ekiti
    Nigeria
    Biography

    Kunle Oni is working at the Department of Food Science & Technology, Federal University Oye-Ekiti Nigeria. Doctor of Philosophy, Food Engineering. Skills and expertise: Food Processing and Engineering, Food Processing, Food Science and Technology, Food Engineering, Food Preservation, Food Technology, Food Production, Food Biotechnology, Post-Harvest Technology, Food Rheology, Physicochemical Properties, Freezing, Food Nanotechnology, Food Irradiation.

    Abstract

    Fried yam, akara (beans cake) and fried fish were purchased from three vendors at Gboko motor park, Gboko market and Dangote cement while control samples were self-processed. The samples were subjected to analysis using standard methods; Results of the analysis showed the following: Iron concentration ranged from 0.13mg/kg – 2.04mg/kg; Zinc 0.12mg/kg – 1.21mg/kg; Manganese 0.74mg/kg – 8.13mg/kg; Cadmium 0.03mg/kg – 0.50mg/kg; Lead 0.02mg/kg – 0.11mg/kg; Chromium 0.00mg/kg – 0.05mg/kg for fried yam. Beans cake samples ranged from 0.11mg/kg – 0.31mg/kg for Iron; 0.09 mg/kg – 0.63mg/kg for Zinc; 0.51mg/kg – 3.30mg/kg for manganese; 0.01mg/kg – 0.04mg/kg for Cadmium; 0.02mg/kg – 0.08mg/kg for Lead; and 0.00mg/kg – 0.03mg/kg for Chromium while fried fish samples ranged from 0.10mg/kg - 0.50mg/kg for Iron; 0.16mg/kg – 0.86mg/kg for zinc; 0.86mg/kg – 5.17mg/kg for manganese; 0.02mg/kg – 0.07mg/kg for Cadmium; 0.03mg/kg – 0.13mg/kg for Lead; and 0.00mg/kg – 0.21mg/kg for Chromium. The analytical results showed that samples obtained from Gboko market had the highest level of contaminants which were also above the JECFA standards. Consumers are encouraged to eat foods that are properly covered from environmental contaminants.

  • Under Five Malnutrition Crises in the Boko Haram Area of Cameroon
    Speaker
    Shalom Jailab
    Under Privilege Children and Women Assistance (UPCAWA-SWEDEN)
    Cameroon
    Biography

    Shalom Jailab is working at Under Privilege Children and Women Assistance (UPCAWA-SWEDEN), Researcher Cameroon Branch, Bamenda, Cameroon. Shalom Jailab has published many research articles in national and international journals.

    Abstract

    Boko-Haram has increased their attacks along the Cameroon boarder in the Far North region of Cameroon since 2013. The prevalence of malnutrition in the north of Cameroon is high. Regions like the Adamawa, North and Far North regions have a prevalence of malnutrition of 5.2%, 6.7%, 9.0%, respectively; and, in addition to that, 1289 children have been admitted for therapeutic care due to malnutrition from the above regions. This crisis has an impact on access to livelihoods, because insecurity reduces access for farmers to harvest and impacts the upcoming sowing season, which has a direct impact on nutrition. Furthermore, the frequent attacks and displacement of persons in the Far North of Cameroon goes hand-in-hand with other issues, such as water shortage, shelter, food shortages and limitations to other basic needs.

  • Undernutrition and its Associated Factors among Lactating Mothers in Rural Ambo District, West Shewa Zone, Oromia Region, Ethiopia
    Speaker
    Eshetu Zerihun
    Arbaminch University
    Ethiopia
    Biography

    Eshetu Zerihun is working as a lecture at Arbaminch University, Ethiopia. He has published many research articles in National and international journals.

    Abstract

    Lactation has different effects on maternal nutritional status. Lactating mothers from low-income settings are considered as nutritionally vulnerable group. Even though, growing number of studies reported the existence of maternal under-nutrition, very few studies in Ethiopia highlighted the issue of under-nutrition among lactating mothers. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of under-nutrition and its associated factors among lactating mothers in rural areas of Ambo district, West Shewa Zone, Central Ethiopia, February 2016. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted among randomly selected 619 lactating mothers. A pretested and structured questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data. Weight and height were measured. Body Mass Index was calculated to assess the nutritional status. Descriptive statistics was used to describe the data. Binary logistic regression was performed to assess the association between each independent and dependent variable. Adjusted odds ratios with its 95% confidence interval were estimated to identify factors associated with the outcome variable in multivariable logistic regression. The overall prevalence of under-nutrition (BMI < 18.5 kg/m2) was 21.5%; 95% CI (18.3, 24.9). Lactating mothers within the age group of 17-25 had 6.8 times more likely to be undernourished than those mothers in the age group of 36-49 [AOR=6.82; 95% CI (1.84, 25.27)]. Mothers who were unable to read and write were 2.45 times more likely to be undernourished than those mothers who had formal education [AOR=2.45; 95%CI (1.22, 4.94)]. Mothers from poor family wealth index were 1.76 times more likely to be undernourished than rich [AOR=1.76; 95% C I (1.05, 2.95)]. In nutshell, the result of this study revealed substantial proportion of under-nutrition among lactating mothers. Age of mother, educational status of the mother and family wealth were found to be the predictors of under-nutrition. Thus, strong multi-sectoral collaboration targeted at improving women educational status and increasing the family wealth is essential.

  • Inculcating Innovative Strategies into Nutrition Education for Adolescents
    Speaker
    Ogunsile Seyi Elizabth
    Ekiti State University
    Nigeria
    Biography

    Ogunsile Seyi Elizabth is working at the Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Ogunsile Seyi Elizabth has published many research papers in National and International journals.

    Abstract

    The intense developmental changes that characterise the period of adolescence, makes it a period of increased nutritional need. However certain factors like increased mobility, the crave for independence and acceptance by peers, greater time spent in school or at work, which show up during adolescent period, often affect adolescents’ food choices so that many of them are not able to fulfil their nutritional needs. To facilitate voluntary adoption of healthy food choices, adolescents need to be properly guided through nutrition education. This is expected to enhance adolescents’ nutrition related knowledge, attitude and practice. To ensure effectiveness of nutrition education among adolescents, it is essential to adopt creative strategies that will capture the attention of adolescents and facilitate retention of what is learnt. This is because adolescents learn best when they are involved in nutrition education. Songs, computer games, board games and drama, are some of the innovative strategies that can be used to complement the conventional teaching method to implement nutrition education progamme among adolescents. Key words: Innovative strategies, nutrition education, knowledge, adolescents, practice

Young Researchers Forum
Speaker
  • The influence of the operating conditions adopted during the extraction on the qualitative and typical characteristics of Tuscan mono-varietal oils (Moraiolo, Leccino, Frantoio)
    Speaker
    Anita Nari
    University of Pisa
    Italy
    Biography

    Anita Nari is graduated in Food Biosafety and Quality. She is a PhD student (II year) in Agriculture, Food and Environment at the University of Pisa with a research project about producing olive oil with a high nutraceutical and organoleptic quality using innovative operative technique (extraction and storage methods). She is interested in R&D activities, development and validation of analytical methods for food quality of raw materials and products, qualification, characterization and monitoring of food technologies.

    Abstract

    As widely reported in literature (1- 2), recent studies have remark and describe the safety and nutritional quality of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO), in particular focusing on its wealth of bioactive compounds (polyphenols, tocopherols, etc.) in preventing oxidation of the lipid components and, therefore, the formation of free radical damaging for human health. These bioactive actions seem to be due both to the quality of raw material (olive fruits) and to the technology adopted for the extraction, indeed the chemical composition and the sensory characteristics of the EVOO is deeply influenced by the technological parameters adopted (3-6). In particular the utilization of suitable working conditions (time and temperature used during the individual phases of the extraction process) could potentially offer the real possibility to plan the concentration of phenolic and volatile components in olive oil and to modulate its nutraceutical properties as well as sensorial perception profile.(7) The main aim of this research project was to describe the influence of the operating conditions (i.e. climate trends, water regime (irrigated or not-irrigated)) on the qualitative and typical characteristics showed by Tuscan mono-varietal EVOOs (Moraiolo, Leccino, Frantoio) during two different crop seasons (2014 vs 2015) characterized by very different climate trends; moreover during the same year (2015), different water regime (irrigated or non-irrigated) were also compared. The experimental data collected show the suitability of the adopted operational decisions to the different conditions (cultivar, climate, water regime) allowing to obtain oils with more favorable compositional indices than those provided by extra virgin olive oil according to the regulation for “Tuscan Protected Geographical Indication” (PGI Toscano).

  • AFB1 removal by Lactabacillus plantarum in Artificially Contaminated Enviroment
    Speaker
    Sebnem KURHAN
    Application and Research Center
    Turkey
    Biography

    Sebnem Kurhan graduated from Uludag University, Bursa, Turkey as Food Engineer in 2010 and attended for Master of Science program in Department of Food Engineering, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey. In 2012 she received a master’s degree. After a short experience in private sector, she has started to work as a specialist and her Ph. D at 2013 spring semester in Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu, Turkey. She works on “DNA-bioprotective effects of industrially important lactic acid bacteria” in her thesis. She has worked as a researcher in 9 national projects and published 1 paper and made 2 oral and 2 poster presentations as author in different international congresses. She has been working as a specialist in Novel Food Technologies Development, Application and Research Center in Abant Izzet Baysal University. She is using actively high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography, laser scanning confocal microscope, flow cytometer and particle size analyzer.

    Abstract

    Lactic acid bacteria whose most of the member belong probiotics are subjected to many research related with their anti-carcinogenic properties. Lactobacillus plantarum is typically responsible for “plant” fermentation including pickle and olive fermentations. Due to their widespread existence in the human and animal diet leaded to gain attraction. In this study we aimed to investigate that the AFB1 removal property of indigenous isolate of L. plantarum. L. plantarum (109 cells/mL) was co-incubated with 5ppm AFB1 containing PBS and samples were collected 0.,3., 6., 12. and 24.hours and immediately analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography equipped with fluorescence detector (HPLC-FLD) without extraction step. L. plantarum cell viability did not change during the co-incubation. HPLC-FLD results showed us L. plantarum cells significantly (75.93% ±3.43) reduced the AFB1 at 12h. This decontamination was not formed any by-product. Thus L. plantarum is capable of AFB1 removal in artificially contaminated environment safely and may prevent chronical exposure in gut before reaching the kidney.

  • Efficacy of nutrition support amongst tuberculosis patients at selected referral hospitals in Malawi
    Speaker
    Mtisunge Banda
    Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural resources
    Malawi
    Biography

    Mtisunge Banda has his expertise in human nutrition and the main passion is improving disease outcomes through clinical nutrition. Keen interest on Drug and diet interactions plus nutrient pathways during metabolism. Qualified to Masters of Science level in human nutrition and Bachelor’s level in nutrition and dietetics. Worked in both hospital and Community nutrition settings and conducted research in different districts in Malawi.

    Abstract

    Statement of the Problem: Tuberculosis remains a considerable global public health concern with over nine million cases and 1.7 million deaths, costing billions of dollars yearly treating, management, high mortality, morbidity and loss of productivity. The nutritional consequences of active TB are well recognized by clinicians, yet little is known about effective nutritional management, nor of the interactions between TB treatment and nutritional status. Malawi has one of the highest TB burdens in the world with estimates 451/100,000 and the poor are most affected by the cost of TB, spending 244% of their monthly incomes. Therefore, this study aimed at conducting a trial in order to provide imperial evidence on the efficacy of supplements and/or combination in conjunction with standard TB treatment. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Randomized factorial design was used and patients were recruited at Bwaila and Queens referral hospitals. Patients were provided with multivitamin and/or high calorie and compared to the control group. Findings: A total of 81 patients were recruited, with 3.7% dropout rate. The mean age of was 35.8 ± 8 years and 80% were males. Mean BMI was 18.7 ± 2.3 and 41.6% classified malnourished. They were gradual increase in BMI to 20.9 kg/m2, presenting 11.8% with p= 0.041. The mean weight gain was 5.9kgs ± 4.3. Performance improvement was recorded with (t=-14.717, p <0.001) using Karnofsky index. Our findings show that the treatment success rate was 86%. The sputum conversion for supplemented was also significant for the supplemented over the controls at RR, 0.39 [95% CI, 0.17 to 0.86, p=0.03] at 2 months. Conclusion & Significance: we found beneficial factors existing of supplements on enhancing sputum conversion rates, treatment success rates, weight gain, improve quality of life, and reduce mortality. Nutritional supplements in tuberculosis patients are a feasible and have public health importance.

  • Geophagia, nutrient intakes and health outcomes of women with pregnancy-induced hypertension
    Speaker
    Deborah Sakua Sackey
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
    Ghana
    Biography

    -

    Abstract

    Calcium is a major nutrient implicated in pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH). Aside dietary source of calcium, geophagia has been reported to provide calcium needed to prevent PIH. These soils are shown to also contain significant amount of heavy metals which have been associated with hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between geophagia and PIH, and assess the dietary intakes and health outcomes in participants. This study was a case-control involving 30 women with PIH and 70 normotensive pregnant women. Percentage intakes of macronutrients for normotensives were within the Adequate Macronutrient Distribution Range and PIH group recorded higher intakes of carbohydrate (72.75±16.16 %), lower protein (9.77±5.61 %) and fat (17.15±11.99%). Dietary calcium intakes in both groups were lower than recommended (?1,000 mg/day). Geophagia and energy drink intake was not significantly associated with PIH. Coffee intake significantly increased the risk of PIH (OR, 4.10; 95% CI 2.10-8.00; p=0.004) while food supplementation during pregnancy significantly reduced the risk of PIH (OR, 0.33; 95% CI 0.17-0.61; p=0.017). Hypertensives recorded impaired fasting blood glucose (5.77±1.71 mmol/L, p=0.051) higher levels of urea (3.60±1.29 mmol/L, p=0.000) and creatinine (382.67±11.66 µmol/L, p=0.000). There was no significant difference in serum calcium and ferritin levels in both groups. PIH women practicing geophagia recorded significantly low levels of haemoglobin, haematocrit and ferritin levels. The total population of pregnant women under this study has considerably low intakes of energy and nutrients. There is the need for measures to ensure adequate maternal nutrition for a positive health and pregnancy outcome. Key words: Nutrition, Pregnancy-induced hypertension, geophagia, supplementation, calcium

Day 2

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • Improvements in long term weight-loss and clinical parameters with the use of nutrigenetics in a 2-years prospective study

    Department of nutrigenetics and personalized nutrition
    Italy
    Biography

    Maria Vranceanu is a nutritionist, specialist in ketogenic diet applications and nutrigenetics. She is a scientific officer at Eurogenetica, department of nutrigenetics and personalized nutrition and CEO and Founder of Mav Diet precision nutrition.

    Abstract

    Objectives: Genetic variation is known may influence dietary requirements, giving rise to the new field of nutritional genomics and raising the possibility of individualizing nutritional intake for optimal health, disease prevention and better weight management on the basis of an individual's genome This study investigated whether the inclusion of genetic information to personalize a patient's diet (nutrigenetics) could improve long term weight management. Methods: Two groups of patients attending a weight management clinic were prospectively studied. The ketogenic group consisted of 53 patients followed for 24 weeks a ketogenic diet plan with 1600 kcal. The nutrigenetics group consisted of 61 patients were offered a nutrigenetic test screening 26 variants in 24 genes involved in metabolism. This group followed a personalized diet with 1600 kcal too and all recommendations based on their DNA. Weight, BMI, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and fasting blood sugar levels were monitored. Results: Both diets group performed well over the 24 weeks but after 2 years the nutrigenetic group fared better on the clinical values of plasma glucose, total cholesterol and HDL. Furthermore after 2 years 75% of the nutrigenetic patients had maintained weight loss compared to 21% in the non-genetic group. Conclusions: Addition of nutrigenetically tailored diets in the weight loss phase and the general healthy eating for life phase resulted in better longer-term BMI reduction and improvements in blood glucose and cholesterol levels

  • Microbiome and antioxidant system of the gut in chicken: food for thoughts

    Feed-Food.Ltd
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Peter Surai has his expertise in animal and human nutrition and published a number of papers as well as two books (“Natural Antioxidants in Avian Nutrition and Reproduction”, 2002; and “Selenium in Nutrition and Health”, 2006) which became textbooks for animal nutritionists. His recent research is devoted to the development of effective strategies to fight commercially relevant stresses in livestock/animal production. He successfully transferred vitagene concept from medical sciences (Calabrese et al., 2007-2016) to animal and poultry sciences (Surai and Fisinin, 2016) and developed stress-prevention programs based on supplying vitagene-regulating nutrients to farm animals via drinking water. He has been awarded honorary professorships in nutritional biochemistry at various universities in the UK, Hungary, Bulgaria, Ukraine and become a foreign member of Russian Academy of Sciences. For the last 15 years he has been lecturing all over the world visiting more than 70 countries.

    Abstract

    The microbiome of the gastrointestinal tract in poultry is one of the major factors affecting health of birds (especially the immune system), their productivity and period of productive use. Furthermore, pathogens and agents of food toxicoinfections in humans (e.g. campylobacteriosis) may result from contamination of eggs and meat with bacteria that are normal in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. There is also an antioxidant-prooxidant balance in the gut that interacts with microbial population and determines gut integrity and inflammation. Our studies indicate that superoxide dismutase and heat shock proteins are major protective mechanisms in the gut, while mycotoxins and oxidized fat in the diet represent negative effectors of gut health. We find that by using vitagene-activating supplements it is possible to improve feed conversion ratio in growing chickens and layers due to improvement of gut antioxidant/redox status and health. Intestinal microflora impact on egg production and meat quality has not been studied well using molecular genetic and genomic techniques in relation to feed additives (e.g. probiotics, antistress additives, etc.) that should be safe for human. Neoteric metagenomic profiling of bacterial communities using T-RFLP, RT-PCR and NGS technology provides a powerful toolbox for monitoring intestinal microflora at all stages of chicken development and performance. Combined with gene expression analysis in the chicken guts, microbiome studies can aid in understanding of nutritional, microbiologic and genetic factors forming poultry health and productivity, and in improving biosafety and quality of poultry products. It seems likely that pathogenic bacteria and prooxidants are on one side of the balance while antioxidants, probiotics and normoflora are on the other side of the balance determining chicken health and their productive and reproductive performance. Understanding this balance is a new promising direction of the research. This research is supported by a grant of the Government of Russian Federation, Contract No. 14.W03.31.0013

  • Major food nutrients and food chemistry is the most powerful tool for the health, reduction in global poverty and hunger in the developing countries of the world like South Asia.

    General of Agricultural Research System
    Pakistan
    Biography

    Muhammad Usman, Former Director General of Agricultural Research System, Government of Pakistan who retired from service after a spotless career of about 35 years with senior level experience on research and development of agricultural industry with regard to food Chemistry, food science and Nutrition, renewable energy, sustainable agriculture of oil seed, cereal, fruits, vegetable and other cash crops. Usman is basically an agricultural scientist with specialization of agricultural Switzerland on 31st Oct, 2012 and food chemistry working as plant breeder with regard to the yield and quality of various agricultural crops as well as nutrition. Mr. Usman has also worked on Biosciences of lipid’s, food legumes crops and Bio-energy. Being a scientist, Mr. Usman has released several oil seeds varieties, presented and published research papers on various oil seeds, and renewable energy in different conferences like Geneva. Usman established “Prominent Agro Based Industries SDN BHD” in Malaysia aims to work on integrated agricultural project like livestock and dairy development, renewable energy etc.

    Abstract

    The aim of presentation consist of major food nutrients, food chemistry and poverty alleviation were studied and reported that food is the basic need of our life and the food chemistry deals with the production, processing, preparation, and utilization of food like plants and animals which are the main source of food and food nutrients. Similarly, the basic food chemistry deals with three major food components such as carbohydrate, lipids and protein which are found in plants and animals cells. It is also called is the food science. Food carbohydrates include sugar, starches and fibers, lipids include fats, oil, waxes and cholesterol. Protein is very important component of food and necessary for the life of human being. All the components are the basic source of energy. In the light of above study, food chemistry and nutrition are not only the basic need of food but also fulfilled the maximum requirements of human beings from the integrated agricultural products of agro based industries like livestock and dairy development, poultry, aqua cultural, apiculture, crops production, fruits, vegetable, seed industries and processing plant. Similarly, agro based industries, food science, food chemistry and nutrition absorbs millions of technical and non-technical people like doctors, engineers, agricultural scientist, technical experts etc which generate income, create employment as well as reduction of global poverty and hunger in the World. It is concluded that agricultural, food science, food chemistry and nutrition are the basic need of our life, generate income, create employment, consequently reduction in poverty and hunger. It was also concluded that in the absence of it life is almost impossible.

Super Food and Functional Foods | Track 11: Probiotic in Nutrition Advancement | Track 12: Food Safety and Security Challenges | Track 13: Food Biotechnology and Microbiology | Track 14: Food Waste Management | Track 15: Food Chemistry and Biochemistry | Track 17: Food Technologies and Processing | Track 18: Food Industry
Speaker
  • TRPV4 calcium-permeable channel is a novel regulator of oxidized LDL-induced Macrophage foam cell formation
    Speaker
    Shaik O. Rahaman
    University of Maryland
    USA
    Biography

    Shaik O. Rahaman, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food science at the University of Maryland, USA. His laboratory is interested in elucidating the molecular signaling events underlying the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases, specifically, atherosclerosis and fibrosis. Dr. Rahaman earned his PhD in Molecular Biology at Jadavpur University, and a BS in Human Physiology (Honors), and an MS in Biophysics and Molecular Biology from University of Calcutta. From 2000-2014, Dr. Rahaman worked at Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, USA, as a Postdoctoral Fellow, eventually as a Project Scientist studying signal transduction in Cell Biology and Oncology. He has received many awards and honors. Dr. Rahaman was honored with Elsa Albrecht Award by Cleveland Clinic, which is awarded for outstanding publication. During 2011-2014, Dr. Rahaman also served as an Assistant Professor at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, USA. In 2013, he was the recipient of the American Heart Association Scientist Development Grant. Dr. Rahaman is the author or co-author of 20 research papers on neurobiology, oncology, atherosclerosis, or fibrosis in high impact international peer-reviewed journals of repute including Cell Metabolism and Journal of Clinical Investigation. Dr. Rahaman has given numerous invited talks nationally and internationally, and is a reviewer/editorial board member in numerous scientific journals. Dr. Rahaman also served as a reviewer for National Institute of Health (USA).

    Abstract

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in developed world, and atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory arterial disease, is the most dominant underlying pathology. Macrophages are thought to orchestrate atherosclerosis by generating lipid-laden foam cells and by secreting inflammatory mediators. Emerging data support a role for a mechanical factor, e.g., matrix stiffness, in regulation of macrophage function and atherogenesis. We have obtained evidence that TRPV4, an ion channel in the transient receptor potential vanilloid family and a known mechanosensor, is the likely mediator of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-dependent macrophage foam cell formation, a critical process in atherogenesis. Specifically, we found that: i) genetic ablation of TRPV4 or pharmacologic inhibition of TRPV4 activity by a specific antagonist blocked oxLDL-induced macrophage foam cell formation, and ii) TRPV4 deficiency prevented matrix stiffness or scratch-induced exacerbation of oxLDL-induced foam cell formation. Mechanistically, we found that: i) plasma membrane localization of TRPV4 was sensitized to the increasing level of matrix stiffness, and ii) TRPV4 activity regulated oxLDL uptake but not its internalization in macrophages. Altogether, these findings identify a novel role for TRPV4 in regulating macrophage foam cell formation by modulating uptake of oxLDL.

  • Greenhouses for food production and the environment
    Speaker
    Abdeen Omer
    Environmental Research Institute
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Abdeen Mustafa Omer (BSc, MSc, PhD) is an Associate Researcher at Energy Research Institute (ERI). He obtained both his PhD degree in the Built Environment and Master of Philosophy degree in Renewable Energy Technologies from the University of Nottingham. He is qualified Mechanical Engineer with a proven track record within the water industry and renewable energy technologies. He has been graduated from University of El Menoufia, Egypt, BSc in Mechanical Engineering. His previous experience involved being a member of the research team at the National Council for Research/Energy Research Institute in Sudan and working director of research and development for National Water Equipment Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Sudan. He has been listed in the book WHO’S WHO in the World 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. He has published over 300 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 200 review articles, 7 books and 150 chapters in books.

    Abstract

    A greenhouse is essentially an enclosed structure, which traps the short wavelength solar radiation and stores the long wavelength thermal radiation to create a favourable microclimate for higher productivity. The sun’s radiation incident on the greenhouse has two parts: direct radiation and an associated diffuse sky radiation. The diffuse part is not focused by the lenses and goes right through Frensel lenses onto the surface of the absorbers. This energy is absorbed and transformed into heat, which is then transported via the liquid medium in copper pipes to the water (heat) storage tanks or, if used, open fish tanks. In this way, an optimal temperature for both plant cultivation and fish production can be maintained. Stable plant growth conditions are light, temperature and air humidity. Light for the photosynthesis of plants comes from the diffuse radiation, which is without substantial fluctuations and variation throughout most of the day. The air temperature inside the greenhouse is one of the factors that have an influence on the precocity of production. The selective collector acts in a more perceptible way on extreme air temperatures inside the greenhouse. Hence, the system makes it possible to avoid the excessive deviation of the temperature inside the greenhouse and provides a favourable microclimate for the precocity of the culture. Sediment and some associated water from the sediment traps are used as organic fertiliser for the plant cultivation. The present trend in greenhouse cultivation is to extend the crop production season in order to maximise use of the equipment and increase annual productivity and profitability. However, in many Mediterranean greenhouses, such practices are limited because the improper cooling methods (mainly natural or forced ventilation) used do not provide the desired micro-climatic condition during the summer of a composite climate. Also, some of these greenhouses have been built where the meteorological conditions require some heating during the winter, particularly at night. The worst scenario is during the winter months when relatively large difference in temperature between day and night occurs. However, overheating of the greenhouse during the day is common, even in winter, requiring ventilation of the structure. Hence, several techniques have been proposed for the storage of the solar energy received by the greenhouse during the day and its use to heat the structure at night. Reviews of such techniques are presented in this chapter. Air or water can be used for heat transport. The circulating water is heated during the day via two processes. The water absorbs part of the infrared radiation of the solar spectrum. Since the water is transparent in the visible region, they do not compete with the plants that need it. Alternatively, the water exchanges heat with the greenhouse air through the walls. At night, if the greenhouse temperature goes down below a specified value, the water begins to circulate acting as heat transfer surfaces heating the air in the greenhouse. This chapter describes various designs of low energy greenhouses. It also, outlines the effect of dense urban building nature on energy consumption, and its contribution to climate change. Measures, which would help to save energy in greenhouses, are also presented. It also enabled the minimisation of temperature variation and, hence avoided the hazard of any sudden climatic change inside the greenhouse.

  • Effect of rapid heating and cooling on sauce and particulate quality
    Speaker
    Ruzaina Ishak
    University of Lincoln
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Ruzaina Ishak completed her Doctor of Philosophy in Science (Food Technology) — Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia, 2015 and Master of Science (Food Processing & Engineering) — Universiti Putra Malaysia, 2006, Bachelor of Science (Food Studies) — Universiti Putra Malaysia, 2002. She is a Senior Lecturer and Program Manager from Management and Science University, Malaysia (MSU). She has 13 years teaching in tertiary level and also involved with research. She also has experience working with government research centre as Research Officer (Edible Packaging-emulsion) at Malaysian Agricultural, Research and Development Institute (MARDI). She started her career as intern student at Malaysian Airlines Catering and Alor Setar General Hospital (Dietetic Unit). After graduated her Bachelor, She worked as Assistant Purchasing Officer at retailing company named Japan United Stores Company (JUSCO) specialised in Fast food department which is now known as AEON. She did one year research attachment under UNESCO Fellowship at Jiangnan University, China. My subject experts are Food Chemistry and Biochemistry, Food Processing and Preservations. She did involve as food bowl quiz judge for national level organised by Malaysian Institute for Food Technologist (MIFT), research judge for invention and innovation competition for universities in Malaysia. She involved as journal reviewer for International Food and Agribusiness Management Association World Symposium & Journal (US), International Journal of Dairy Science since 2010, Journal of Food Processing and Preservation. Her majoring is food hydrocolloids, emulsion and edible packaging for food product.

    Abstract

    From farm to fork represented ‘food miles’. Customer nowadays craving for a better food products in a minute. Therefore, highly food processing technology being in demanding. Singapore and Chow Mein noodle sauces were produced by rapid cooking (steam infusion) and cooled by rapid cooling system. Samples were collected after pump and after rapid cooling process. Both were stored at chill and freeze conditions. Samples were analysed for particle size, viscosity, colour and appearance. Carrots were run and analysed as part of the ingredients as particulate samples. Samples were collected using the same method and analysed for colour and texture. Viscosity measurement for Singapore and Chow Mein noodle sauces showed that there were no different (P<0.05) except Chow Mein at chilled condition. No different for particle size and colour as well. However, the appearance showed that rapid cooling samples slightly diluted. For particulates (carrot), the temperature slightly increased from 4.4°C up to 6.1°C (during 1 hour). There were no different for % of whole destroy for both process but only showed significantly (P>0.05) different from raw carrot. There were firmness reduction for carrot after rapid cooling process compared to after pump samples. Colour of carrots show no different. Overall, rapid cooling process produced high quality sauces and particulates in a very short time.

  • Bioactive fiber: Bioactivity of Cereal arabinoxylans in Relation to Their Sources and Structure
    Speaker
    Weili Li
    University of Chester
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Weii Li is currently Professor of Food Technology at the University of Chester. She is a leading expert in the development of functional foods particularly bakery products. She has a considerable interest in bioactivities of dietary fibre and functionality of omega 3 fatty acids, particularly in the development of bioactive arabinoxylans sourced from the milling waste of wheat, rice and other cereal products as functional food components and the introduction of vegetable-sourced Omega-3, 6 and 9 fatty acids into foods.

    Abstract

    Arabinoxylans are major components of cereal cell walls and they occur at higher content in the by-products of milling, wheat brans, rich brans and rice hulls of dietary fibre than in wheat flour and rice. Arabinoxylans have been reported to have numerous health benefits in recent studies. This presentation will report our recent studies on effects of cereal arabinoxylan extracts with various molecular weights and structures on their human immunity modulation and anticancer activity in in vitro testing. The extraction yield and structure of AXs varied with sources and extraction technologies. In this study, AXs were extracted from wheat flour pentosan with and without xylanase treatment. In in vitro testing, nitric oxide (NO) secretion and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression of human immune cells of U937 induced by enzyme extracted AXs and water extracted AX were compared. The results show that AXs treatments not only enhanced NO production but also iNOS levels in U937 cells (P < 0.05) compared to untreated cells. The enzyme-treated AXs with a higher proportion of low Mw AXs (1-10KDa) and high A/X ratio (0.83) induced significantly higher (P < 0.05) iNOS expression (132.2 ± 11.9 ?g/ml) than water-extracted AXs iNOS expression (104.3 ± 4.6?g/ml) and the increase in NO secretion corresponds to iNOS concentration in cultured cells, which suggest a pathway by which AXs modulate NO production in human macrophage cells. In addition, It was also found that at a concentration of 500µg/mL, enzyme-treated AXs caused a more significant inhibition of proliferation of Gastric cancer cells (p<0.05) and also more significantly reduced the viability of Gastric cancer cells than water extracted AXs following 24 and 48 hours treatment in in vitro (p<0.05). Therefore, a potential application of AXs is potentially used as a new method of treating gastric cancers.

  • Determination of microbiocoenoses in the intestine of the Hisex Brown hens in ontogenesis using T-RFLP method
    Speaker
    Michael N Romanov
    University of Kent
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Michael N Romanov has his expertise in avian genetics and genomics including participation in a number of national and international research projects in the areas of avian genetic diversity, gene/genome mapping, candidate genes evaluation, and comparative genomics. After years of experience in studies and teaching in both research and education institutions, he recently began leading on a project sponsored by the Government of Russian Federation. The project is aimed at developing state-of-the-art biotechnologies to assess gene expression in relation to performance and disease resistance in poultry industry, and will be done in collaboration with the Moscow State Academy of Veterinary Medicine and Biotechnology in 2017–2019.

    Abstract

    Microbiocoenoses in the gastrointestinal tract, especially in the ceca, play an important part in life processes of poultry. Identification of the structure and taxonomic composition of microorganisms in the cecum using molecular genetic methods serves as a crucial approach in understanding how a cecal microbiota interplays with the chicken organism during ontogenesis. For this purpose, we studied an intestinal bacterial community composition in the ceca of the Hisex Brown laying hens at age of 40, 155 and 315 days using T-RFLP and RT-PCR. In the chickens studied, development of the cecal microbial communities, changes in their content, and appearance of new microorganisms occurred in the ontogeny. A broader spectrum of bacteria was found in 40- and 155-day-old birds (221±11 and 258±9 phylotypes, respectively) as compared with 315-day-old laying hens (178±8 phylotypes). Also, 315-day-old birds showed the least content of unidentified phylotypes. In the ceca of adult hens, there was a change in the dominant microbial taxonomic groups including a higher proportion of acid-utilising bacteria of the class Negativicutes and cellulolytic bacteria of the class Clostridia, with a lower content of the classes Bifidobacteriales and Bacillales. Lactobacteria (order Lactobacillales) showed a greater content in 315-day-old laying hens (33.15±1.05%) as compared with 40- and 155-day-old birds (5.13±0.23% and 24.58 ± 0.86%, respectively). The variety and number of bacteria in the ceca conventionally attributed to various pathogens of poultry diseases, including the genera Enterobacter, Pantoea, Listeria, Acinetobacter and Mycoplasma, families Campylobacteraceae and Pasteurellaceae, and phylum Fusobacteria, increased with the age of birds. Thus, in the course of molecular genetic studies, the species composition and dynamics of the microbiocoenoses in the cecum of the Hisex Brown laying hens was determined as related to their ontogeny.

  • Sourdough bread obtained from a dough fortified with anthocyanin-rich flour from the purple potato cv. Vitelotte as nutraceutical sources: Its quality attributes
    Speaker
    Angela Zinnai
    University of Pisa
    Italy
    Biography

    She has completed her 1st Ph.D at the age of 25 years from the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, Pisa. She is a Professor of Food technology of Pisa University. In 2008, she received a “Special Mention” at “Montana Premium” for Food Science Research (with her colleague Venturi F.). She has published more than 100 papers in journals or volumes and serving as a referee for research projects and papers. She was a scientific responsible for an Original Patent (PT2009A000018), an author of two Original Patents of Pisa University. She was Invited Speaker and part of the organizing committee for several national and international workshops and conferences.

    Abstract

    When used in optimized proportions, sourdough can improve volume, texture, flavour, and nutritional value of bread, and may increase the shelf life by retarding the staling process and protecting bread from mould and bacterial spoilage (1). In this context, to satisfy the increasing demand for products with higher nutritional value, sourdough bread was fortified with purple potatoes, an ancient cv. Vitelotte, with purple pulp. Changes in nutraceutical properties were estimated analyzing anthocyanin contents, phenolic composition as well as antioxidant power (2, 3). The nutritional and chemical composition, together with the sensory profile were also described, following the methods reported in literature (4, 5). The preliminary results indicate that chemical composition of sourdough bread, as well as sensorial expression, might be greatly influenced by the addition of purple potato floor. In particular, bread also retained high levels of phenols, explaining its higher antioxidant activity compared to the traditional sourdough bread, and suggests that Vitelotte can represent a good source of phenols for the fortification of bread.

  • Design and Production of Food processing machine using under water shock wave for practical application
    Speaker
    Ken Shimojima
    Okinawa College
    Japan
    Biography

    He finished doctor course and worked at assistant professor on Tokyo Denki University at 2004. He worked at assistant professor on Sophia University from 2004 to 2009. Now he is working at associate professor on National Institute of Technology, Okinawa College from 2009.

    Abstract

    A food processing machine that generates underwater shock waves has been developed at OkNCT. The processing method using a spalling phenomenon, it is different from the conventional processing method. The processing effects are improvement of extractability, softening, and sterilization without heating. In this report, the following contents are reported. 1. The processing mechanism of the spalling phenomenon by underwater shock wave and the optical observation of shock wave. 2. The processing method of this device. 3. A result that some food was processed experimentally by this device. 3. The summary of consecutive driving devices for practical use. When a shock wave goes through the plant, I am divided into a reflection and transmission wave in the interface of the difference of the density. Tension power occurs in this interface. Then, the food is crashed by this phenomenon. Figure shows a food processing machine for test crashing using underwater shock wave. This device consists of a power supply, a processing unit. The pressure vessel in the processing unit, this inside is filled with water, and electrode of two sets are installed in center of vessel. Electric energy charged in a condenser is supplied to an electrode by a gap switch, and a shock wave occurs with electric collapse. The food is covered by a silicone hose, and it is crushed in the atmosphere. We crushed several food by this device, and inspected the processing effect. Results such as the milling flour of rice and the coffee, softening of a meat and a carrot and an apple, the sterilization of a powder are introduced. We developed consecutive operations processing device that practical use was possible.

  • A Consideration of Underwater Shock Wave Behavior at Interface for Various Acoustic Impedance Materials using the Computational Prediction
    Speaker
    Yoshikazu HIGA
    Okinawa College
    Japan
    Biography

    After earning two degrees in Mechanical Engineering from University of RYUKYUS, Yoshikazu HIGA received his Dr Eng degree in Mechanical Engineering in 2000 from KOBE University, and started for his post as Research Associate at OSAKA University. He became Lecturer at Osaka Univ. in 2004, and moved to Associated Professor of Mechanical Systems Engineering at National Institute of Technology, OKINAWA College in 2005, also became Professor in 2014 and currently holds that position. He is currently a member of The Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) and The Society of Materials Science, Japan (JSMS). He also serves as a committee member of international / domestic conferences and symposiums. His research fields are the theoretical and computational crystal plasticity and computational multiphysics, as well as approximately 80 papers dealing with experimental study and computational simulation of multiphysics phenomena. He has received a number of awards the JSME Hatakeyama Prize in 1995, the Best Paper Award in ESIT2016 conference in 2016.

    Abstract

    Recently, the methodology and technology of food treatment using underwater shock wave has been attracting attentions as a novel processing. The shock wave targeted in our research is a pulse wave of a momentary and high-pressure power. The pulse wave propagates in a medium such as water, air and food faster than the speed of sound. The shock wave induced by the underwater electrical wire explosion can generate the momentary extremely high pressure power, and also achieve no-heating/no-destruction associated with a flavor and nutritive value as process in microsecond timescale. Therefore, it is very expected as a novel food processing technology. An example of pre-processing meat and vegetable, food sterilization, oil extraction and the rice powder manufacturing system have been experimentally reported in the past. Regarding the development of the corresponding food processing equipment, suitable devices must be designed to satisfy various conditions. Their design is extremely difficult, however, to investigate experimentally because there are so many parameters to consider in ensuring suitable food processing, and the shock wave propagation phenomenon ends in a very short time. Thus, it is very helpful for a computational simulation to be performed to investigate shock wave propagation in the proposed food processing vessel. Therefore, in this paper, to reveal shock wave propagation characteristics in foods, computational models of the food, the surrounding water, and the high pressure source were developed using the commercial finite element software. By conducting a series of numerical simulations, the pressure distribution in various foods associated with their acoustic impedances has been discussed.

  • Greek children suffering from asthma abandon Mediterranean dietary pattern: Baseline results
    Speaker
    Maria Papamichael
    La Trobe University
    Australia
    Biography

    Maria Papamichael is a registered dietician who has dedicated her life in educating people the importance of good nutrition and exercise in the prevention and management of disease as well as in improving health and well-being. Being an asthma sufferer since childhood, has motivated her to undertake a PhD research project at La Trobe University to investigate the prophylactic potential of a Mediterranean diet enriched with fatty fish in the management of asthma in children.

    Abstract

    Statement of problem: The rapid rise in paediatric asthma has become a major public health concern. Apart from a genetic predisposition, poor dietary habits have been implicated as one of the environmental factors responsible for the asthma epidemic. Emerging evidence from observational studies has documented a reduction in asthma prevalence and wheezing in children consuming a Mediterranean diet. However, intervention trials investigating the association between food groups and dietary patterns in children are lacking. The purpose of this RCT study is to investigate whether an increase in fatty fish consumption in the context of a Mediterranean diet reduces asthma symptoms in Greek children. Methodology: Children aged 5-12 years with doctor-diagnosed ‘mild asthma’ were recruited from a paediatric asthma clinic in Athens, Greece and randomized into two groups. The intervention group is instructed to consume 2 serves of fatty fish per week (at least 150g cooked fish/serve) for 6 months. And the control group, their usual diet. Questionnaires are used to collect information on medical, dietary, socio-demographic, asthma control and quality of life. Respiratory function is evaluated using spirometry and exhaled nitric oxide analysis. KIDMED test is used to evaluate adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern. Findings: At baseline, from a sample of 72 children (54.2% boys, 45.8% girls), mean KIDMED score is 5.38 ± 2.02; 21.1% of children have “Very low adherence”, 60.6% “Need for improvement” and 18.3% “Optimal Mediterranean diet” adherence according to the KIDMED test. Conclusion & Significance: There is a clear trend of abandonment of the Mediterranean lifestyle in Greek children. Given the sustainability and overall health benefits of the Mediterranean dietary pattern, it is essential that public health strategies focus on its promotion. Future clinical trials are recommended to provide concrete evidence on the efficacy of the Mediterranean diet in the management of childhood asthma.

  • The prevalence of complications in Type 2 diabetics in diabetes centers in Dubai
    Speaker
    Haleama Al Sabbah
    Zayed University
    United Arab Emirates
    Biography

    Haleama Al Sabbah is working at Zayed University, Dubai at the Public Health Nutrition Department since Sept. 2013. Haleama has completed her Ph.D in Public Health Nutrition in 2008 from Gent University-Belgium. Master in International Community Health with special focus on Diabetes Self-Management in 2000 from Oslo University-Norway. Haleama was a Fulbright Visiting Scholar, did her Post-Doctoral studies in Nutrition at Tufts University, Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Center (2011-2012). She was the director of Public Health Department at the Faculty of Medicine, An-Najah National University, West Bank-Palestine. She has many published articles in scientific peered review journals and serving as an editorial board member and reviewer for many scientific journals. She participated in many conferences, courses and research studies in all over the world including Europe, USA, Canada, West Africa and some Arab countries. Her Specialties: Public Health, Nutrition, Obesity, Diabetes and Research.

    Abstract

    Background: Diabetes complications have been increasingly prevalent among type 2 diabetics during the past decades causing high rates of morbidity and mortality. Measures of the prevalence of diabetes complications will lead to preventive decisions and planning of health care. Objective: To assess the prevalence rates of complications in Type 2 diabetics in two Diabetes Centers in Dubai. Methodology: A cross-sectional descriptive analytical study conducted among type 2 diabetics attending diabetes centers in Dubai. Data was collected form secondary source using patient’s records from two diabetes centers involved in the study. Random sampling technique was used to collect 150 patients proportionally allocated according to the total patients (4700 attending patients) available in the two diabetes centers. Results: The study showed that the most dominant prevalence type of complications: Hyperlipidemia (84%), Neuropathy (34%), Dyslipidemia (32%), Retinopathy (28%), Lethargy (21.3%), and Nephropathy (16.7%). The associations made between three variables each separately (Date of First Visit, HbA1c, and Fasting Blood Glucose) with the prevalence type of complications, showed significant differences in some types: Dyslipidemia, Hyperlipidemia, and Neuropathy, Retinopathy, and Joint & Bone pain. Conclusion: There is a reasonable correlation between different variables and the prevalence of complications among the diabetic population, thus studies should always follow up on this issue in order to have clear associations to prevent complications from occurring in the first place. Keywords: Diabetes Type 2, Complications, Diabetes Center, Dubai, Prevalence

  • Immunomodulating effects of the ?-glucan from Pleurotus cornucopiae mushroom on macrophage actions
    Speaker
    Ken-ichiro Minato
    Meijo University
    Japan
    Biography

    Ken-ichiro Minato devotes to find a suitable functional food which could maintain our immune system. His own research interest has been how food factors, such as polysaccharides and polyphenols, act as an immunomodulator for monocyte, macrophages and dendritic cells in an innate immune system. His current targets are both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of ?-glucan in edible mushrooms on activities of those innate immunocompetent cells. Another his interest is a differentiation of macrophage toward M1/M2 and their activities. Macrophages develop from hematopoietic stem cells through common myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow, and repopulate in peripheral tissues. Currently it is thought that macrophages can be classified into several different phenotypes, based on their reactions to different microenvironments. The heterogeneity of undifferentiated circulating monocytes may affect their polarization once they arrive in inflamed tissues. Dr. Minato hopes to find a suitable functional food, which could prevent inflammatory diseases.

    Abstract

    Many edible mushrooms have become attractive as “health foods” and as source materials for immunomodulators. Recently, the polysaccharide (PCPS) from Pleurotus citrinopileatus mushroom has been identified as a ?-glucan which activates dendritic cells (DCs) by upregulation of the secretion or expression of many pro-inflammatory mediators. Moreover, we have shown that the PCPS has the capacity to activate the cells via multiple pathways. In this study, we set out to investigate the immune modulating properties of the PCPS using macrophage-like cells derived from a THP-1 cell line as well as DCs. The PCPS stimulated the THP-1 macrophages to secrete significant levels of TNF. Moreover, the mRNA expression of TNF and IL-1? were significantly enhanced by the PCPS treatment. However, the glucan did not induce to express both IL-12 and IL-10 mRNA in the macrophages. Next, in vivo experiments, the P. cornucopiae extract (containing mainly PCPS) treatment against BALB/c mice showed significant increases in TNF and IL-1? mRNA expressions in the peritoneal macrophages of them. These results suggested that the PCPS could induce pro-inflammatory action in an innate immune response. Meanwhile, the PCPS-treatment did not show any influence on an expression of IFN? mRNA in the lymphocytes of the mice spleen despite it inhibited an expression of IL-4, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, mRNA in this study. Moreover, interestingly, regarding the influence of the PCPS on macrophage differentiation, the glucan suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF and IL-6, from differentiated macrophages, suggesting that the PCPS could promote monocyte to differentiate into M2 macrophage. These findings suggested that this edible mushroom, the P. cornucopiae, could pleiotropically regulate macrophage activities by the ?-glucan.

  • The effects of fat substitution using palm stearin on the physicochemical properties of shortened cake
    Speaker
    Chek Zaini Hassan
    Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia
    Malaysia
    Biography

    Madya Chek Zaini Hassan is working as a Professor at Department Food Biotechnoloy Faculty Science and Technology, Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia. She completed her Bachelors of Science in Foodservice Management (Hons.), University of New Haven, Connecticut, USA 1981, Masters of Science in Human Nutrition and Foodservice Management, University of Nebraska, USA in 1987. She is worked as a Dean of Faculty of Hotel and Tourism, UiTM (1093-1998), Human Resource and Training Manager in INTEKMA Resort (UiTM) from (1999-2002), Director of Research Management (USIM) from 2009-2011; Research interest: Human Nutrition and Health, Foodservice, Product Development , Bakery Science and Technology, Beverage Technology.

    Abstract

    Fats used in baking contain trans fatty acid that has been proven to contribute towardsvarious health problems. Palm stearin is used to substitute shortening in different ratiosto observe the effects on the physicochemical properties of cake. Formulations A, B, C,D, and E each has palm stearin substitution of 0 %, 25 %, 50 %, 75 %, and 100 %respectively. All formulations were analysed for its specific gravity, fat content,moisture content, colour analysis, texture analysis and sensory analysis. At 25 % levelof substitution (formula B), moisture content (0.44 ±0.00 %), fat content (27.75 ± 0.42%), hardness (1469.4 ± 432.1 N), and overall liking in sensory analysis (5.5 ± 1.10) arefound to be similar with formula A. Formula B for colour analysis 80.84 ± 0.20 (L*),2.79 ± 0.40 (a*), and 30.30 ± 0.64 (b*) and specific gravity (0.84 ± 0.12) are howeversignificantly different with formula A. It is found that a different substitution ratio doesaffect the physicochemical properties of the cakes. Substitution up to 25 % shows thatit is best in producing cakes most similar to formula A. Further studies need to becarried out in order to find a method that may incorporate higher palm stearinsubstitution as well as palm stearin functionality in a cake system.

  • Effect of domestic processing methods on all Trans and cis isomers of beta carotene retention in green leafy vegetables
    Speaker
    Sreenivasa Rao Jarapala
    National Institute of Nutrition
    India
    Biography

    Sreenivasa Rao J has expertise in nutrition and micronutrient evaluation studies from foods and indigenous food samples and passion in improving the retention of micronutrients using processing methods towards the health and wellbeing. He is working on plant secondary metabolites and bio conversion of beta carotene to vitamin A in plant foods. He has published his research contributions in elsewhere journals. He is having two decades of experience in nutrition research and teaching in institution. His research contributions on micronutrients retention studies may help to prevent the vitamin A deficiencies in developing world. He received young scientist award (Sagarmal goenka) in 2012 and best research paper award in nutrition research from USA in 2016. Presently he is working on tribal indigenous foods, plant secondary metabolites and heavy metals in Indian foods. His core area of research is carotenoids bio accessibility and bioconversion to vitamin A and nutrient retention in foods. He is a life member of NSI, SBCI, IDA, IIIS and several other nutrition relevant research bodies.

    Abstract

    Green leafy vegetables (GLVs) are pigment-rich and nutritionally relevant functional food sources with unique phytochemical constitution that includes carotenoids. Carotenoids and their geometric isomers protect cells from oxidation and cellular damages. Cooking processes that involve factors such as temperature, light and alteration in moisture content generally promote either isomerization (trans to cis form) or oxidative degradation of carotenoids to epoxides. Studies pertaining to the effect of cooking methods on dietary carotenoids and their geometric isomers are inadequate in Indian foods. The extent of carotenoid isomeration were evaluated in GLVs such as amaranth (Amaranthus gangeticus), spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and curry leaves (Murraya koenigii) subjected to domestic cooking methods of microwave, sautéing, pressure cooking and deep frying in oil for time durations of 8 and 12 minutes, either with and without lid covering. The isomers of carotenoids were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using vydac column (RP-C-18) with 100% methanol for first 5 minutes and methanol: chloroform (96:4) for the subsequent run as gradient mobile phase. Tran’s ?-carotene content in amaranth ranged from 5525 to 6375 µg/100g upon boiling without lid and microwave cooking. 9-cis isomer of beta carotene is the predominant geometric isomer formed during cooking in all the GLV studied (Amaranth: 423 to 620, Spinach: 377 to 443, Curry leaves: 562 to 687 µg/100g). 13 cis isomers also formed in the processed GLV samples (22 to 375 µg/100g). 15 cis beta carotene was observed in few food samples during processing and not observed in some of the methods which processed. The retention percentage of all Trans and cis beta carotene was also studied. These isomers of beta carotenes were also for the precursors of Vitamin A. The changes in the contents of Trans and cis isomers of carotenes in GLVs in correlation to various cooking methods are discussed which would be valuable for food researchers, nutritionists and health practitioners in promoting nutritionally balanced diets and minimize vitamin A deficiency in Indian contest.

  • Comparative evaluation of the therapeutic effect of Metformin monotherapy with Metformin and acupuncture combined therapy on weight loss and insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients
    Speaker
    Amir Firouzjaei
    Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine & Iranian Scientific Association of Acupuncture, Iran
    China
    Biography

    Amir Firouzjaei is currently working as a Dean of acupuncture department at pardis multiple pain clinic, Acupuncturist, Tehran, Iran. He completed his Clinical Ph.D in Chinese Medicine, Acupuncture and Moxibustion specialty, Nanjing at the University of Chinese Medicine (Full time Clinical Ph.D.). Doctorate in Medicine, General Physician Specialty (full term M.D. study).

    Abstract

    Objective: Obesity induces insulin resistance (IR), the key etiologic defect of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Therefore, an incidence of obesity-induced diabetes is expected to decrease if obesity is controlled. Although, Metformin is currently one of the main treatment options for T2DM in obese patients, resulting in an average of 5% weight loss, adequate weight control in all patients cannot be achieved with Metformin alone. Thus, additional therapies with a weight loss effect, such as acupuncture, may improve the effectiveness of Metformin. Subjective: We designed this randomized clinical trial (RCT) to compare the effects of Metformin monotherapy with that of Metformin and acupuncture combined therapy on weight loss and insulin sensitivity among overweight/obese T2DM patients, to understand whether acupuncture plus Metformin is a better approach then Metformin only on treating diabetes. To understand whether acupuncture can be an insulin-sensitizer and, if so, its therapeutic mechanism. Results: Our results show that Metformin and acupuncture combined therapy significantly improves body weight, body mass index (BMI), fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin (FINS), homeostasis model assessment index (HOMA), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), leptin, adiponectin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), resistin, serotonin, free fatty acids (FFAs), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), and ceramides. Conclusion: Consequently, Metformin and acupuncture combined therapy is more effective than Metformin only, proving that acupuncture is an insulin-sensitizer and is able to improves insulin sensitivity possibly by reducing body weight and inflammation, while improving lipid metabolism and adipokines. As a result, electro-acupuncture (EA) might be useful in controlling the ongoing epidemics in obesity and T2DM.

  • Consumer perception and purchase behaviour towards processed foods at the University of Venda
    Speaker
    Mbhatsani Hlekani Vanessa.
    University of Venda
    South Africa
    Biography

    Hlekani Vanessa Mbhatsani is a Lecturer of Nutrition at the University of Venda and a registered Nutritionist with the Health Professional Council of South Africa. She has received both her undergraduate BSc and MSc in Public Nutrition at the University of Venda. As a Post-graduate student she was given an opportunity to perform Research and Teaching Assistant functions. This provoked the teaching and research interest that led her to applying for the lecturing position after completion of her MSc. To enhance her teaching responsibilities, she persuaded a Post graduate Diploma in Higher Education at Rhodes University. She is currently studying towards her PhD with Stellenbosch University. Her research areas of interest include micronutrients, role of indigenous foods in health and nutrition, child nutrition and food security. She is a co-author of chapter six in a book titled “Community Nutrition for South Africa; A Right Based Approach”. She has presented her work both in national and international conferences and only published a few articles in peer reviewed journals

    Abstract

    Background: Globally the prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing at an alarming rate. The convenience that many highly processed foods offer may also encourage unhealthy eating patterns, such as skipping meals and over consuming calories. There is therefore reason to believe that high consumption of ready-to-consume food products in general, is a cause of NCDs. Objectives: To investigate consumers’ perceptions and purchase behaviour towards processed foods among university students. Methodology: The study design was convergent parallel mixed methods where in qualitative and quantitative methods were used to collect data. Purposive sampling was used to select the sampling frame and 150 students were conveniently selected. An interview guide and interviewee administered questionnaire were used to collect data from individual students. A tape recorder, researcher’s notes and a peer notes were used to record qualitative data. Qualitative data was analyzed using thematic analysis wherein the process of triangulation was followed and Quantitative analysis was done using a software. Results: Most consumers 45% understood processed foods as foods which have additives that keep them fresh and prolong their shelf life. About half of consumers 56.7% perceive processed foods as having negative health effects. Qualitative data show that consumers believed that these foods when consumed regularly may lead to overweight”. All consumers 100% in this study purchase bread, canned beans and fish, potato chips (80%), vetkoek(doughnut without cream) (69%) and breakfast cereals (45%) regularly. However, cheese, polony, viena and ready to eat meals were purchased once a week. The reasons for buying processed foods were mainly convenience (43.3%), consumers gave other reasons such as affordability, and good taste, and this was mentioned by 5% of consumers respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion all consumers had knowledge about processed foods based on the researcher’s discretion. Although these were university students they had negative perception towards processed foods. Key words: consumers, processed foods, behaviour, purchase and students

  • Effect of IUGR on Serotonergic Transmission in Infants
    Speaker
    Jorge Hernández-Rodríguez
    Universidad de Querétaro
    Mexico
    Biography

    Jorge Hernández Rodríguez is a Professor of Physiology and Biophysics and Neurosciences Department of Biophysics and Neurosciences, IPN Advanced Research and Research Centre, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico.

    Abstract

    We evaluated whether the plasma free fraction of L-Tryptophan(FFT) and the N1/P2 component of the pimary auditory cortex response-wave to specific stimuli (PACR), are associated with impaired brain serotonin(5-HT) neurotransmission in infants with IUGR (Intrauterine Growth Restriction). The FFT, total and bound plasma L-Tryptophan (L-Trp) and the N1/P2 component of PACR, were measusred in a prospective longitudinal and comparative study between IUGR and normal control infants. FFT was increased and the aplitude of N1/P2 component was remarkably diminished in IUGR, relative to control infants. These two parameters had a negative association.So,we conluded that in IUGR infants, since birth up to 60 days of posnatal life, the present results suggest an inverse association between FFT and the N1/P2 component of the auditory cortex response to specific stimuli. The changes observed in the FFT and PACR, may be causally related with an increased brain serotonergic activity in utero and in posnatal life. In IUGR, epignetic factors such as nuitritional and metabolic stress-induced disturbances in brain 5-HT metabolism and in serotonergic neuronal activity, identifiable by the alterations in PACR, may influence sensory cortex development and early morphogenetic normal changes, as we have observed in the somatosensory cortex and that in posnatal life be related to serotonin disorders in adulthood.

  • Alcohol consumption and commonly consumed food among youth in Mokopane in Limpopo province, South Africa
    Speaker
    Selekane Ananias Motadi
    University of Venda
    South Africa
    Biography

    Selekane Ananias Motadi is a junior lecturer of Nutrition at the University of Venda. He received his junior degree BSc in Nutrition at the University of Venda. In 2010, He registered for Master Degree in Public Nutrition at the same university. He is a registered Nutritionist with Health Professional Council of South Africa. He was offered tenure in the Department of Nutrition. In addition to teaching, Mr. Motadi is a regular contributor to the micronutrient malnutrition particularly zinc and a Mamelodi sundowns United fan. He has registered for postgraduate diploma in health professional education at the University of Cape Town which he envisages completing in 2015. He has collaborated on manuscripts with Prof XG Mbhenyane, Dr. RL Mamabolo, Ms. HV Mbhatsani and Mr. NS Mabapa entitled “Prevalence of zinc deficiency among children aged 3-5 years in Vhembe district, Limpopo province, South Africa”. He currently resides in Limpopo Province, South Africa with his brother.

    Abstract

    Introduction Alcoholic consumption has been a part of social life for decades, yet many people have always found it problematic to understand or confine their use. South Africa has a high percentage of people who consume alcohol and who are not physically active as compared to other developing countries. Moreover, the use of alcoholic beverages has been an integral part of many cultures for thousands of years in South Africa Objectives: To determine alcohol consumption and commonly consumed food among youth in Mokopane. Methods: This study included 160 youth recruited from the villages in Mokopane which is found in Mogalakwena Local municipality of Limpopo province, South Africa. Villages were selected using simple random sampling and snowballing sampling was used to choose study participants. Body weight and height, waist and hip were measured using standard technique. Food consumption was collected using 24-hour recall and food frequency questionnaire. Alcohol was assessed with quantity-frequency method. Alcohol consumption was categorized into three groups: non-drinkers (<12grams), moderate drinkers (12-167 grams for men, 12-83grams for women), and heavy drinkers (?168 for men, ? for women). Results: Waist circumference of women was higher than those of men (p<0.018). Furthermore, the mean systolic and diastolic were 117.33 ±3.06 and 117.14 ±9.35 respectively. In addition, the mean glucose level of heavy drinkers for men was lower 4.20 ±0.44 as compared to their counterparts 5.27 ±1.26. BMI was positively correlated with Systolic (r=0.395; p<0.000), Diastolic (r=0.276; p<0.000) and Glucose (r=0.385; p<0.000). There was no significant difference in the following highly consumed food items in both men and women except with the consumption of milk between men (p<0.05) and women (p=0.591). In addition, there were significant difference in the consumption of cabbage between men (p=0.582) and women (p<0.019). Furthermore, there were significant difference in the consumption of beans in both men (p=0.944) and women (p<0.044). Conclusion: Men consumed more alcohol than women and some of the gender differences. This gender gap is one of the few universal gender differences in human social behavior. The most commonly consumed food items were grouped according to starchy foods (which are normally the staple foods amongst most South Africans), protein foods, fats, milk and milk products, fruits, vegetables and beverages.

  • Nutritional Assessment of Children with Sickle Cell Diseases in Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital
    Speaker
    Osei Bonsu Tracy
    Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology
    Ghana
    Biography

    Tracy Osei Bonsu is a final year MPhil Human Nutrition and Dietetics student. Her first degree was taken in Bachelor of education home economics with specialization in food and nutrition. Her interest in child nutrition lead to the reach of nutritional assessment in children with sickle cell diseases. As part of the research nutrient intake was also assessed.

    Abstract

    Background: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a long term haemolytic disease mostly associated with impaired growth, delayed maturation and poor nutrition status. It is also one of the major contributing factors for childhood mortality. Objective: The study aimed to assess the nutritional status of children with sickle cell diseases using dietary intakes, anthropometric measurements and biochemical markers. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 100 children with sickle cell diseases aged 3- 12 years at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital. Twenty-four hour dietary recall and food frequency questionnaire were used to assess dietary intake. Serum protein, albumin and ferritin as well as full blood count were used to assess biochemical status. Weight, height and Mid-Upper-Arm-Circumference were used to calculate Body Mass Index (BMI), weight-for-age (percentile), height-for-age (percentile), BMI-for-age (percentile) and MUAC-for-age (percentile). Main findings: The mean intake of iron was 5.9±3.0 mg/d, zinc was 5.1±3.0 mg/d, and vitamin A was 107 ± 112.4, while vitamin E was 4.2±2.9 for the children with SCD. Calories were 852 ± 342.3 kcal while protein was 25.0 ± 10.7g/d. Low BMI-for-age, MUAC-for-age, weight-for-age and height-for-age were observed in 40%, 37%, 22%, and 69% of the children, respectively. Conclusion/ Recommendation: There was significant association (p = 0.00, r = 0.64) between vitamin B12 and the Red Blood Cell count. Thus, there was inadequate nutritional intake of the children that were assessed. It is therefore recommended that a longitudinal study be conducted on children with sickle cell diseases to assess the actual nutritional requirements of children with SCD. Key words: Sickle cell diseases, Nutrition, Children

  • Neuroprotective, neurotrophic and neurogenesis potential of apigenin and luteolin in Parkinson’s Disease treatment
    Speaker
    Sadhana Sathaye
    Institute of Chemical Technology
    India
    Biography

    Prof. Sadhana Sathaye is an eminent research scientist working in the field of pharmacology with an academic experience of 24 years. The overreaching fields of her research encompass various neurological and neurodegenerative disorders like epilepsy, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease along with diabetes mellitus and related complications. Her research group works with a clear vision of establishing novel therapeutic interventions as well as neutraceutical supplements by exploring herbs and modern medicinal drugs. She has over 63 national and international publications to her credentials and has been a renowned speaker in several esteemed national and international conferences. Her horizon is not limited to academia but expands to industry wherein she extends her services as a consultant to the pharmaceutical industry in India.

    Abstract

    Statement of the Problem: Parkinson's disease (PD) is a second most common, slowly progressive, neurodegenerative disorder. The motor and non-motor neuropsychiatric symptoms namely dementia, depression, anxiety, apathy and psychosis affect patient’s quality and quantity of life. This imposes enormous burden on patient’s family and a serious economic drain on the society. Genetic susceptibility, stressful lifestyle and environmental factors contribute in the PD pathophysiology. These factors increase oxidative stress related damage, triggering the inflammatory cascade and ultimately neuronal apoptosis. This leads to progression of neuronal degeneration and appearance of PD symptoms. Thus, development of therapeutic strategies for symptomatic relief along with disease modifying effects becomes the urgent clinical need. Multitude of evidences suggests that nutritional supplements and indigenous phytoconstituents prevent/cure most life-threatening diseases and exhibit several therapeutic benefits such as neuroprotection, antioxidant potential, neurogenesis, enhancement of synaptic plasticity etc. Thus, we aim to investigate the effect of polyphenols such as apigenin and luteolin which are commonly present in many plants for their therapeutic potential in PD. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: We evaluated the therapeutic roles of the apigenin and luteolin by treating MPTP induced mice for 21 days. The activity was studied with the help of various behavioral and biochemical parameters. The biochemical parameters included the estimation of oxidative stress, inflammation, neurotrophic factors and neurogenesis. Findings: Our results demonstrated that apigenin and luteolin treatment improved the locomotor and motor activities in MPTP treated mice. Both significantly enhanced the endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity and curbed inflammation in the neuronal cells. The reduction in TH-positive cells caused by MPTP treatment was protected by Apigenin and luteolin. Significant elevation in neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was also observed. Additionally, both the polyphenols promoted neurogenesis and were found to enhance spatial memory formation in animals. Conclusion & Significance: Our study endorses neuroprotective, neurotrophic and neurogenesis potential of apigenin and luteolin at preclinical stage. They can be prospective candidates to slow/halt the progression of PD and improve the overall quality of life of PD patient. Findings of the present study suggest that healthy and balanced diet rich with nutritional constituents can improve general well-being and quality of life.

  • Analysis of Nutrient Management Program at the health centers in Region District Health Bireuen, Aceh, Indonesia Year 2011
    Speaker
    Mainora
    Bireuen District Health Office
    Indonesia
    Biography

    Mainora, a civil servant in charge of Bireuen District Health Office, Aceh, Indonesia as manager of Nutrition program. She is currently studying at the University of Indonesia public health postgraduate

    Abstract

    Systems approach in management is an approach in improving health care quality in integral. The system is made up of several components that influence each other; these components are the input, process and output. Authors are interested in seeing the analysis of nutrient management programs in health centers in the county health department because of several factors, namely Bireuen energy, less weight infants and the ability of local administration. Purpose to analyze how the management of nutrition programs in health centers in the area of Bireuen district health office with a systematic approach consists of three components, namely input, process, output. Descriptive study design evaluation studies that use the research to assess a program that is being or has been done to repair or improvement program conducted in May 2012. The sample population was 18 people and Implementing Energy Nutrition (Nutrition Coordinator) health centers in 18 health centers in the area of Bireuen district health department. Results: The component input has not been a good nutrition program, because the new 44% good and 56% are still lacking. Component of the nutrition program has not been good, because only 39% good and 61% are still lacking. Nutritional components of program output is still not good because only 11% good and 89% are still lacking. Conclusion: Components of nutrient input program consisting of energy, technical instructions, valid data, facilities and allocation of funds has not been good. Component of the nutrition program that consists of planning, implementation, coordination, advocacy and monitoring and evaluation is still not good. Output components of nutrition program consisting of eight indicators of achievement SPM field of nutrition is still not good. The government is expected to be able to increase the acceptance of Bireuen district health nutrition field. District Health Office is expected to Bireuen to improve training in particular areas of health management nutrition program nutrition programs so that the achievement of SPM, the health center is expected to improve coordination and advocacy as well as nutrition programs so that the output is achieved SPM nutrition programs for the community health centers work in the region.

  • Immunomodulation by Food
    Speaker
    Vaibhav D. Aher
    Matoshri College of Pharmacy
    India
    Biography

    Vaibhav D. Aher has completed his Master in Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Ph.D. from National Institute of Medical Sciences, India in Pharmaceutical Sciences. He has postdoctoral studies from Defence Research Laboratory, Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO), Assam, India and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, USA. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a reviewer of repute. His research experience in the field of immunomodulatory and gentoxicity studies.

    Abstract

    An optimally active and balanced immune system is a pre-requisite for maintaining health. Immunity strongly varies at different life stages. Over past few decades, well balanced immune system for maintaining good health has been crucial. There is a strong consensus that nutrition plays a role in modulating immune function and that the immune system needs adequate supply of nutrients to function properly. The intricacy of the immune system supports this idea because its optimal functioning involves a variety of biological activities including cell division and proliferation, energy metabolism, anti-genotoxicity and production of proteins. The micronutrients most often cited as being important to immune function include vitamins A, C, E, and B6, folate, iron, zinc, and selenium. Other nutrients mentioned as playing a role in immune function include beta-carotene (a precursor to vitamin A), vitamin B12, and vitamin D. On the other hand, over-activation of the immune system can lead to detrimental effects such as chronic inflammation or autoimmune diseases. In persons with allergies, a normally harmless material can be mistaken as an antigen. This review will highlight the interaction between the immune system and some foods and food components in terms of modulation of immune functions by a variety of mechanisms.

  • Current classroom practice in the teaching of food technology: is it fit for purpose in the 21st Century?
    Speaker
    VEENA SONI
    JAI NARAYAN VYAS UNIVERSITY
    India
    Biography

    Veena Soni is working at Jai Narayan Vyas University, Jodhpur (Raj), India. Veena Soni has published many research papers in national and international journals.

    Abstract

    This paper builds on a research project exploring what secondary school pupils in England should learn in a modern food technology curriculum. The early stages of the research investigated the views of a range of professionals interested in teaching food technology and suggested a framework for a modern food technology curriculum, which would include: • Designing and making food products; • Underpinned by an understanding of the science of food, cooking and nutrition; • Incorporating an exploration of both existing and new and emerging food technologies; • In the context of sustainable development of food supplies locally, nationally and globally; • Including an appreciation of the roles of the consumer, the food industry and government agencies in influencing, monitoring, regulating and developing the food we eat. (Rutland, 2009, p5). The next stages of the project explored the views of a number of stakeholders of the framework. These included initial teacher educators, teachers, providers of professional development courses for design and technology teachers, higher education lecturers, examining bodies concerned with the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) food technology courses for pupils aged 16 years and the General Certificate of Education (GCE) for pupils aged 18 years and researchers working for the food industry. This paper presents the findings of an analysis of a small sample of Key Stage 3 (pupils aged 1114 years) English secondary schools’ food technology schemes of work (SoW), against the suggested food technology framework. The framework was elaborated to give more details of the potential content and used to critique the schemes of work based on current practice in the classroom. The key findings were that to ensure a modern technologically challenging food technology curriculum fit for the 21st Century, Key Stage 3 pupils need a broader and more challenging curriculum. It should teach pupils a wider range of appropriate designing strategies aimed at making design decisions other than aesthetic, such conceptual, technical, constructional or marketing. There should be more attention given to progression and continuity from the primary Key Stage 2 (children aged 7-11 years) in the products the pupils design and make and the scientific and nutritional knowledge and understanding that underpins their work. The pupils should learn about new and existing food technologies, issues related to food sources and sustainability and gain more understanding of themselves as consumers and the role of the food industry and government agencies in their lives. KEY WORDS:- FOOD TECHNOLOGY ,21 CENTURY ,CLASSROOM PRACTICE

  • Fuel Characterization of Food Composite Residues and Briquettes Produced from Rice Husk, Groundnut Shell and Corncob Blends
    Speaker
    Kunle Oni
    Federal University Oye Ekiti
    Nigeria
    Biography

    Kunle Oni is working at the Department of Food Science & Technology, Federal University Oye-Ekiti Nigeria. Doctor of Philosophy, Food Engineering. Skills and expertise: Food Processing and Engineering, Food Processing, Food Science and Technology, Food Engineering, Food Preservation, Food Technology, Food Production, Food Biotechnology, Post-Harvest Technology, Food Rheology, Physicochemical Properties, Freezing, Food Nanotechnology, Food Irradiation.

    Abstract

    briquettes production for domestic and industrial cottage utilization depends on the residues’ physical and fuel characteristics. For residues to be used efficiently and rationally as fuel, they must be characterized to determine their positive and negative attributes. This study therefore, investigated the physical and fuel characteristics for both the residues and blends of rice hull, groundnut shell and corncob. The residues were subjected to size reduction process and variance analysis was used to establish the influence of each sample blends. Different samples of briquettes were produced by blending varying loads of food waste materials in the ratio (00:00:00), for each rice hull : groundnut shell : corncob blends using cassava starch as a binder. The residue’ dimensions and densifications of the sample briquettes were determined using standard methods. The results revealed the following ranges: compressed density dimensions; mass (0.075 - 0.099Kg/m3), volume (0.001 - 0.002m3), height (1.0357 - 1.0343m), relaxed density dimensions; mass (0.049 - 0.210Kg/m3), volume (0.0001 -0.0002m3), height (1.0357 - 1.0343m), residual density of 104, 105, and 103 (Kg/m3) for rice hull, groundnut shell and corncob respectively, densification; compressed density (461.22 - 627.24 Kg/m3), relaxed density (285.47 - 393.63 Kg/m3), density ratio (0.56 - 0.66), relaxation ratio (1.52 - 1.79), and compaction ratio (1.46 to 2.01). Generally, significant (p<0.05) differences existed between the samples in almost all the parameters. Briquette blend formulations led to significant (p<0.05) differences in the height, internal and external diameters of the briquettes. Addition of groundnut shell and corncob to the blends significantly (p<0.05) increased the masses of compressed and relaxed density of the briquettes. The relaxed density (density after 14 days of production) values decreased with change in formulations, while the compressed density values increased.

  • Relative Effectiveness of Four Nutrition Education Strategies on Dietary Related Knowledge, Attitude and Practice
    Speaker
    Ogunsile Seyi Elizabth
    Ekiti State University
    Nigeria
    Biography

    Ogunsile Seyi Elizabth is working at the Department of Human Kinetics and Health Education, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Ogunsile Seyi Elizabth has published many research papers in National and International journals.

    Abstract

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of four nutrition education strategies in improving dietary related knowledge, attitude and practice among adolescents. Design : Pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design was adopted in this study. This is to be be able to make comparison among groups. Participant: Three hundred and three adolescents (159 boys, 144 girls, mean age 13.6±1.45) selected from eight secondary schools in Ibadan, South-West Nigeria, constituted the participants for the study. Methodology: Questionnaire was the instrument used to assess dietary knowledge, attitude and practice. The study consisted of three experimental and one control group. All the groups had nutrition education once in a week for eight weeks. Experimental groups used conventional teaching method and additional teaching strategies (songs, board game and a combination of songs and board game respectively), while the control group made use of conventional teaching method alone. Data analysis was done using paired t-Test and inferences were made at 0.05 level of significance. The nutrition education programme took place between January and March 2014. Results: Nutrition education complemented with board game had the highest effect on adolescents’ dietary knowledge (Mean gain = 6.4, t(78) = 22.84, p=0.000. Combination of songs and board game had the highest effect on attitude and practice (Mean gain =8.4, t(87) = 11.31, p=0.000, (Mean gain =8.6, t(87) = 15.88, p=0.000, respectively. Conclusions: The findings of this study is an indication that nutrition education involving combination of strategies is effective in improving dietary related outcomes among adolescents. These methods could therefore be of great benefit if inculcated into nutrition education programmes for adolescents.

  • Prediabetes among Nigerian adolescents: A School-based study of the prevalence, risk factors and pattern of fasting blood glucose in Ibadan, Nigeria
    Speaker
    Ikeola Adejoke Adeoye
    University of Ibadan
    Nigeria
    Biography

    Ikeola Adeoye is a public health physician and a lecturer at the Department of Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Ibadan/University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria. Her research interest are maternal and child health in Nigeria and more recently metabolic health particularly diabetes and its risk factors among the Nigeria population. She was a recipient of the Bill and Mellinda Gates award for Masters in Public Health with a special focus on population and reproductive health. She is currently a PhD CARTA fellow – Consortium of Advanced Research Training for Africa and the focus of her PhD is the exploring the intersection between maternal and metabolic health among pregnant women in Ibadan through their nutrition and lifestyle during pregnancy.

    Abstract

    Prediabetes, the reversible precursor of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), among adolescents is becoming a public health concern in low and middle income countries. This increase is attributed partly to the rise in behavioural and cardio-metabolic risk factors. T2DM is a chronic debilitating illness which is associated with life-threatening complications which has a worse prognosis when the illness starts from adolescence. The assessment of the prevalence and risk factors among adolescence is crucial for implementing preventive programs in Nigeria account for the highest burden of T2DM in Africa. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a two stage cluster sampling technique among 500 adolescents from 10 randomly selected secondary schools in Ibadan. Information on the socio-demographic and lifestyle characteristics and certain measures including blood pressure, anthropometric measurements and fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels were assessed. Prediabetes was defined as FBG between 100–125 mg/dl. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and bivariate logistic regression at 5 % level of significance. The overall prevalence of prediabetes among the adolescents was 4.0 % and the mean FBG of adolescents was 85.3±8.2. Males had significantly higher levels of FBG—mean difference [1.65:95 % CI (0.017–3.14) p=0.03]. Factors that increased the odds for prediabetes included frequent consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (OR=1.45; 95 % CI 0.46–3.30; p=0.48), attending a private school (OR=2.58; 95 % CI 0.77– 9.0; p=0.66) and being overweight or obese (OR=2.91; 95 % CI 0.38–22.3; p=0.30). Similarly, those who skipped breakfast [1.29; 95 % CI (?0.23; ?2.8) p=0.096] had higher FBG, those who walked daily back from school [?2.07; 95 % CI (?3.55; ? 0.59) p=0.01] had significantly lower FBG. Prediabetes and risk factors are prevalent among the secondary school adolescents in Ibadan. Surveillance of potential risk factors through school-based screening among adolescents is crucial for prevention and early intervention.

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